THE POETRY ARCHIVES @ eMule.com PRINT CLOSE

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Robert Herrick

(1591-1674)

  • A CONJURATION: TO ELECTRA
       By those soft tods of wool,
  • HIS CONTENT IN THE COUNTRY
       HERE, Here I live with what my board
  • NOT EVERY DAY FIT FOR VERSE
       'Tis not ev'ry day that I
  • THE BEGGAR TO MAB, THE FAIRY QUEEN
       Please your Grace, from out your store
  • THE BELL-MAN
       From noise of scare-fires rest ye free
  • THE CEREMONIES FOR CANDLEMAS DAY
       Kindle the Christmas brand, and then
  • THE SUCCESSION OF THE FOUR SWEET MONTHS
       First, April, she with mellow showers
  • THINGS MORTAL STILL MUTABLE
       Things are uncertain; and the more we get,
  • TO ANTHEA, WHO MAY COMMAND HIM ANY THING
       Bid me to live, and I will live
  • TO DIANEME
       Give me one kiss,
  • TO HIS KINSWOMAN, MISTRESS SUSANNA HERRICK
       When I consider, dearest, thou dost stay
  • TO PERlLLA
       Ah, my Perilla! dost thou grieve to see
  • LOVE DISLIKES NOTHING
       Whatsoever thing I see,
  • A BUCOLIC BETWIXT TWO;LACON AND THYRSIS
       LACON. For a kiss or two, confess,
  • A CANTICLE TO APOLLO
       Play, Phoebus, on thy lute,
  • A COUNTRY LIFE:TO HIS BROTHER, MR THOMAS HERRICK
       Thrice, and above, blest, my soul's half, art thou,
  • A DIALOGUE BETWIXT HIMSELF AND MISTRESS ELIZAWHEELER, UNDER THE NAME OF AMARILLIS
       My dearest Love, since thou wilt go,
  • A HYMN TO BACCHUS
       Bacchus, let me drink no more!
  • A HYMN TO LOVE
       I will confess
  • A HYMN TO THE GRACES
       When I love, as some have told
  • A HYMN TO VENUS AND CUPID
       Sea-born goddess, let me be
  • A MEAN IN OUR MEANS
       Though frankincense the deities require,
  • A MEDITATION FOR HIS MISTRESS
       You are a Tulip seen to-day,
  • A NEW YEAR'S GIFT,SENT TO SIR SIMEON STEWARD
       No news of navies burnt at seas;
  • A PANEGYRIC TO SIR LEWIS PEMBERTON
       Till I shall come again, let this suffice,
  • A PARANAETICALL, OR ADVISIVE VERSETO HIS FRIEND, MR JOHN WICKS
       Is this a life, to break thy sleep,
  • A PASTORAL SUNG TO THE KING
        MON. Bad are the times. SIL. And worse than they are we.
  • A PASTORAL UPON THE BIRTH OF PRINCE CHARLES:PRESENTED TO THE KING, AND SET BY MR NIC. LANIERE
       AMIN. Good day, Mirtillo. MIRT. And to you no less;
  • A REQUEST TO THE GRACES
       Ponder my words, if so that any be
  • A Thanksgiving To God, For His House
       Lord, Thou hast given me a cell
  • A THANKSGIVING TO GOD, FOR HIS HOUSE
       Lord, thou hast given me a cell,
  • A VOW TO VENUS
       Happily I had a sight
  • ALL THINGS DECAY AND DIE
       All things decay with time: The forest sees
  • AMBITION
       In man, ambition is the common'st thing;
  • AN EPITAPH UPON A CHILD
       Virgins promised when I died,
  • AN EPITAPH UPON A VIRGIN
       Here a solemn fast we keep,
  • AN HYMN TO THE MUSES
       Honour to you who sit
  • An Ode For Ben Jonson
       Ah Ben
  • AN ODE FOR BEN JONSON
       Ah Ben!
  • AN ODE OF THE BIRTH OF OUR SAVIOUR
       In numbers, and but these few,
  • AN ODE TO SIR CLIPSBY CREW
       Here we securely live, and eat
  • ANACREONTIC
       Born I was to be old,
  • Another Grace For A Child
       Here a little child I stand
  • ANTHEA'S RETRACTATION
       Anthea laugh'd, and, fearing lest excess
  • ART ABOVE NATURE: TO JULIA
        When I behold a forest spread
  • BARLEY-BREAK; OR, LAST IN HELL
       We two are last in hell; what may we fear
  • BURIAL
       Man may want land to live in; but for all
  • CASUALTIES
       Good things, that come of course, far less do please
  • CEREMONIES FOR CANDLEMAS EVE
       Down with the rosemary and bays,
  • CEREMONY UPON CANDLEMAS EVE
        Down with the rosemary, and so
  • CHERRY RIPE
       Cherry-ripe, ripe, ripe, I cry,
  • Cherry- Ripe
       CHERRY-RIPE, ripe, ripe, I cry,
  • COCK-CROW
       Bell-man of night, if I about shall go
  • COMFORT TO A YOUTH THAT HAD LOST HIS LOVE
       What needs complaints,
  • Corinna's Going A-Maying
       Get up, get up for shame, the blooming Morn
  • CRUTCHES
       Thou see'st me, Lucia, this year droop;
  • Delight In Disorder
       A sweet disorder in the dress
  • DELIGHT IN DISORDER
       A sweet disorder in the dress
  • Discontents In Devon
       More discontents I never had
  • DREAMS
       Here we are all, by day; by night we're hurl'd
  • ETERNITY
       O years! and age! farewell:
  • FAREWELL FROST, OR WELCOME SPRING
       Fled are the frosts, and now the fields appear
  • FELICITY QUICK OF FLIGHT
       Every time seems short to be
  • FOUR THINGS MAKE US HAPPY HERE
       Health is the first good lent to men;
  • GOOD PRECEPTS, OR COUNSEL
       In all thy need, be thou possest
  • GRACE FOR A CHILD
       Here, a little child, I stand,
  • HER BED
       See'st thou that cloud as silver clear,
  • HIS AGE:DEDICATED TO HIS PECULIAR FRIEND,MR JOHN WICKES, UNDER THE NAME OFPOSTUMUS
       Ah, Posthumus! our years hence fly
  • HIS COVENANT OR PROTESTATION TO JULIA
       Why dost thou wound and break my heart,
  • HIS DESIRE
       Give me a man that is not dull,
  • HIS GRANGE, OR PRIVATE WEALTH
       Though clock,
  • HIS LAST REQUEST TO JULIA
       I have been wanton, and too bold, I fear,
  • HIS LITANY, TO THE HOLY SPIRIT
       In the hour of my distress,
  • HIS LOSS
       All has been plunder'd from me but my wit:
  • HIS MISTRESS TO HIM AT HIS FAREWELL
       You may vow I'll not forget
  • HIS POETRY HIS PILLAR
       Only a little more
  • His Prayer For Absolution
       For those my unbaptized rhymes,
  • His Prayer To Ben Jonson
       When I a verse shall make,
  • HIS REQUEST TO JULIA
       Julia, if I chance to die
  • His Return To London
       From the dull confines of the drooping west
  • HIS RETURN TO LONDON
       From the dull confines of the drooping west,
  • HIS SAILING FROM JULIA
       When that day comes, whose evening says I'm gone
  • HIS WINDING-SHEET
       Come thou, who art the wine and wit
  • His Wish To God
       I would to God, that mine old age might have
  • HIS WISH TO PRIVACY
       Give me a cell
  • HOW HIS SOUL CAME ENSNARED
       My soul would one day go and seek
  • HOW PANSIES OR HEARTS-EASE CAME FIRST
       Frolic virgins once these were,
  • HOW SPRINGS CAME FIRST
       These springs were maidens once that loved,
  • I CALL AND I CALL
       I call, I call: who do ye call?
  • IMPOSSIBILITIES: TO HIS FRIEND
       My faithful friend, if you can see
  • KISSING USURY
       Biancha, let
  • LIFE IS THE BODY'S LIGHT
       Life is the body's light; which, once declining,
  • LOSS FROM THE LEAST
       Great men by small means oft are overthrown;
  • LOVE LIGHTLY PLEASED
       Let fair or foul my mistress be,
  • LOVE, WHAT IT IS
        Love is a circle, that doth restless move
  • LOVERS HOW THEY COME AND PART
       A Gyges ring they bear about them still,
  • MAN'S DYING-PLACE UNCERTAIN
       Man knows where first he ships himself; but he
  • MATINS, OR MORNING PRAYER
       When with the virgin morning thou dost rise,
  • MEN MIND NO STATE IN SICKNESS
       That flow of gallants which approach
  • MIRTH
       True mirth resides not in the smiling skin;
  • MONEY MAKES THE MIRTH
       When all birds else do of their music fail,
  • MRS ELIZ: WHEELER, UNDER THE NAME OF THELOST SHEPHERDESS
       Among the myrtles as I walk'd
  • NO FAULT IN WOMEN
       No fault in women, to refuse
  • NO MAN WITHOUT MONEY
       No man such rare parts hath, that he can swim,
  • NO PAINS, NO GAINS
       If little labour, little are our gains;
  • NOTHING FREE-COST
       Nothing comes free-cost here; Jove will not let
  • OF LOVE: A SONNET
       How Love came in, I do not know,
  • ON A PERFUMED LADY
       You say you're sweet: how should we know
  • ON HIMSELF
       A wearied pilgrim I have wander'd here,
  • ON HIMSELF
       Weep for the dead, for they have lost this light;
  • ON HIMSELF
       I'll write no more of love, but now repent
  • ON HIMSELF
       Lost to the world; lost to myself; alone
  • ON HlMSELF
       Live by thy Muse thou shalt, when others die,
  • ON LOVE
       Love's of itself too sweet; the best of all
  • ORPHEUS
       Orpheus he went, as poets tell,
  • PARDONS
       Those ends in war the best contentment bring,
  • PEACE NOT PERMANENT
       Great cities seldom rest; if there be none
  • POVERTY AND RICHES
       Who with a little cannot be content,
  • PRAY AND PROSPER
       First offer incense; then, thy field and meads
  • PURPOSES
       No wrath of men, or rage of seas,
  • SAFETY ON THE SHORE
       What though the sea be calm? Trust to the shore;
  • SATISFACTION FOR SUFFERINGS
       For all our works a recompence is sure;
  • SOFT MUSIC
       The mellow touch of music most doth wound
  • TEARS AND LAUGHTER
       Knew'st thou one month would take thy life away,
  • THE APPARITION OF HIS, MISTRESS,CALLING HIM TO ELYSIUM
       Come then, and like two doves with silvery wings,
  • THE APRON OF FLOWERS
       To gather flowers, Sappha went,
  • The Argument Of His Book
       I sing of brooks, of blossoms, birds, and bowers,
  • The Bad Season Makes The Poet Sad
       Dull to myself, and almost dead to these
  • THE BAD SEASON MAKES THE POET SAD
       Dull to myself, and almost dead to these,
  • THE BAG OF THE BEE
       About the sweet bag of a bee
  • THE BELL-MAN
       Along the dark and silent night,
  • THE BLEEDING HAND; OR THE SPRIG OF EGLANTINE GIVEN TO A MAID
       From this bleeding hand of mine,
  • THE BRACELET TO JULIA
        Why I tie about thy wrist,
  • THE BRIDE-CAKE
       This day, my Julia, thou must make
  • THE BUBBLE: A SONG
       To my revenge, and to her desperate fears,
  • THE CAPTIVE BEE; OR, THE LITTLE FILCHER
       As Julia once a-slumb'ring lay,
  • THE CAPTIVE BEE; OR, THE LITTLE FILCHER
       As Julia once a-slumb'ring lay,
  • THE CHANGES: TO CORINNA
       Be not proud, but now incline
  • THE CHEAT OF CUPID; OR, THE UNGENTLE GUEST
       One silent night of late,
  • THE COMING OF GOOD LUCK
       So Good-Luck came, and on my roof did light,
  • THE COUNTRY LIFE:
       Sweet country life, to such unknown,
  • THE CRUEL MAID
       --AND, cruel maid, because I see
  • THE DEFINITION OF BEAUTY
       Beauty no other thing is, than a beam
  • THE DIRGE OF JEPHTHAH'S DAUGHTER:SUNG BY THE VIRGINS
       O thou, the wonder of all days!
  • THE FAIRIES
       If ye will with Mab find grace,
  • THE FAIRY TEMPLE; OR, OBERON'S CHAPEL
       A way enchaced with glass and beads
  • THE FUNERAL RITES OF THE ROSE
       The Rose was sick, and smiling died;
  • THE HAG
       The Hag is astride,
  • THE HEART
       In prayer the lips ne'er act the winning part
  • THE HOCK-CART, OR HARVEST HOME:TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE MILDMAY, EARL OF WESTMORLAND
       Come, Sons of Summer, by whose toil
  • THE INVITATION
       To sup with thee thou didst me home invite,
  • THE KISS: A DIALOGUE
       1 Among thy fancies, tell me this,
  • THE LILY IN A CRYSTAL
       You have beheld a smiling rose
  • THE MAD MAID'S SONG
       Good morrow to the day so fair;
  • THE MAYPOLE
       The May-pole is up,
  • THE NIGHT PIECE: TO JULIA
       Her eyes the glow-worm lend thee,
  • The Night Piect, To Julia
       Her eyes the glow-worm lend thee,
  • THE OLD WIVES' PRAYER
       Holy-Rood, come forth and shield
  • THE OLIVE BRANCH
       Sadly I walk'd within the field,
  • THE PARCAE; OR, THREE DAINTY DESTINIES:THE ARMILET
       Three lovely sisters working were,
  • THE PARLIAMENT OF ROSES TO JULIA
       I dreamt the Roses one time went
  • THE PLAUDITE, OR END OF LIFE
       If after rude and boisterous seas
  • THE PRESENT TIME BEST PLEASETH
       Praise, they that will, times past: I joy to see
  • THE PRESENT; OR, THE BAG OF THE BEE:
       Fly to my mistress, pretty pilfering bee,
  • THE PRIMROSE
       Ask me why I send you here
  • THE ROCK OF RUBIES, AND THE QUARRY OFPEARLS
       Some ask'd me where the Rubies grew:
  • THE SHOWER OF BLOSSOMS
       Love in a shower of blossoms came
  • THE TRANSFIGURATION
       Immortal clothing I put on
  • The Vine
       I dreamed this mortal part of mine
  • THE VOICE AND VIOL
       Rare is the voice itself: but when we sing
  • THE WAKE
       Come, Anthea, let us two
  • THE WASSAIL
       Give way, give way, ye gates, and win
  • THE WATCH
       Man is a watch, wound up at first, but never
  • THE WHITE ISLAND:OR PLACE OF THE BLEST
       In this world, the Isle of Dreams,
  • THE WIDOWS' TEARS; OR, DIRGE OF DORCAS
       Come pity us, all ye who see
  • THE WOUNDED HEART
       Come, bring your sampler, and with art
  • TO A GENTLEWOMAN, OBJECTING TO HIM HISGRAY HAIRS
       Am I despised, because you say;
  • TO ANTHEA
       Anthea, I am going hence
  • TO ANTHEA
       Now is the time when all the lights wax dim;
  • TO ANTHEA
       AH, my Anthea ! Must my heart still break ?
  • TO BACCHUS: A CANTICLE
       Whither dost thou hurry me,
  • TO BE MERRY
       Let's now take our time,
  • TO BLOSSOMS
       Fair pledges of a fruitful tree,
  • TO CARNATIONS: A SONG
       Stay while ye will, or go,
  • TO DAFFADILS
       Fair Daffadils, we weep to see
  • To Daffodils
       Fair Daffodils, we weep to see
  • TO DAISIES, NOT TO SHUT SO SOON
       Shut not so soon; the dull-eyed night
  • TO DEATH
       Thou bidst me come away,
  • TO DIANEME
       I could but see thee yesterday
  • TO DIANEME
       Sweet, be not proud of those two eyes,
  • TO DIANEME
       Dear, though to part it be a hell,
  • TO ELECTRA
       I dare not ask a kiss,
  • TO ENJOY THE TIME
       While fates permit us, let's be merry;
  • TO GROVES
       Ye silent shades, whose each tree here
  • TO HEAVEN
       Open thy gates
  • TO HIS BOOK
       Make haste away, and let one be
  • TO HIS BOOK
       Be bold, my Book, nor be abash'd, or fear
  • TO HIS BOOK
       Go thou forth, my book, though late,
  • TO HIS BOOK
       If hap it must, that I must see thee lie
  • TO HIS BOOK
       Take mine advice, and go not near
  • To His Conscience
       Can I not sin, but thou wilt be
  • TO HIS CONSCIENCE
       Can I not sin, but thou wilt be
  • TO HIS DYING BROTHER, MASTER WILLIAM HERRICK
       Life of my life, take not so soon thy flight,
  • TO HIS HONOURED AND MOST INGENIOUS FRIENDMR CHARLES COTTON
       For brave comportment, wit without offence,
  • TO HIS LOVELY MISTRESSES
       One night i'th' year, my dearest Bmauties, come,
  • TO HIS MISTRESS, OBJECTING TO HIM NEITHERTOYING OR TALKING
       You say I love not, 'cause I do not play
  • TO HIS MUSE
       Whither, mad maiden, wilt thou roam?
  • TO HIS PATERNAL COUNTRY
       O earth! earth! earth! hear thou my voice, and be
  • TO HIS PECULIAR FRIEND, MR JOHN WICKS
       Since shed or cottage I have none,
  • TO HIS SAVIOUR, A CHILD;A PRESENT, BY A CHILD
       Go, pretty child, and bear this flower
  • TO HIS SWEET SAVIOUR
       Night hath no wings to him that cannot sleep;
  • TO HIS VERSES
       What will ye, my poor orphans, do,
  • TO JULIA
       How rich and pleasing thou, my Julia, art,
  • TO LAURELS
       A funeral stone
  • TO LIVE FREELY
       Let's live in haste; use pleasures while we may;
  • TO LIVE MERRILY,AND TO TRUST TO GOOD VERSES
       Now is the time for mirth;
  • To Live Merrily, And To Trust To Good Verses
       Now is the time for mirth,
  • TO MEADOWS
       Ye have been fresh and green,
  • TO MISTRESS KATHARINE BRADSHAW, THE LOVELY, THAT CROWNED HIM WITH LAUREL
       My Muse in meads has spent her many hours
  • TO MUSIC
       Begin to charm, and as thou strok'st mine ears
  • TO MUSIC, TO BECALM A SWEET SICK YOUTH
       Charms, that call down the moon from out her sphere,
  • TO MUSIC, TO BECALM HIS FEVER
       Charm me asleep, and melt me so
  • TO MUSIC: A SONG
       Music, thou queen of heaven, care-charming spell,
  • TO OENONE.
       What conscience, say, is it in thee,
  • TO PANSIES
       Ah, Cruel Love! must I endure
  • TO PERENNA
       When I thy parts run o'er, I can't espy
  • TO PHILLIS, TO LOVE AND LIVE WITH HIM
       Live, live with me, and thou shalt see
  • TO PRIMROSES FILLED WITH MORNING DEW
       Why do ye weep, sweet babes? can tears
  • TO ROBIN RED-BREAST
       Laid out for dead, let thy last kindness be
  • TO SAPHO
       Sapho, I will chuse to go
  • TO SILVIA
       Pardon my trespass, Silvia! I confess
  • TO SILVIA TO WED
       Let us, though late, at last, my Silvia, wed;
  • TO SIR CLIPSBY CREW
       Since to the country first I came,
  • TO THE GENIUS OF HIS HOUSE
       Command the roof, great Genius, and from thence
  • TO THE HANDSOME MISTRESS GRACE POTTER
       As is your name, so is your comely face
  • TO THE LADY CREWE, UPON THE DEATH OF HER CHILD
       Why, Madam, will ye longer weep,
  • TO THE MAIDS, TO WALK ABROAD
       Come, sit we under yonder tree,
  • TO THE ROSE: SONG
       Go, happy Rose, and interwove
  • To The Virgins, To Make Much Of Time
        Gather ye rose-buds while ye may,
  • TO THE VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME
       Gather ye rose-buds while ye may:
  • TO THE WATER-NYMPHS DRINKING AT THEFOUNTAIN
       Reach with your whiter hands to me
  • TO THE WILLOW-TREE
       Thou art to all lost love the best,
  • TO VIOLETS
       Welcome, maids of honour,
  • TO YOUTH
       Drink wine, and live here blitheful while ye may;
  • TRUTH AND ERROR
       Twixt truth and error, there's this difference known
  • Up Scoble
       Scobble for whoredom whips his wife and cries
  • Upon A Child
       Here a pretty baby lies
  • UPON A CHILD
       Here a pretty baby lies
  • Upon A Child That Died
       Here she lies, a pretty bud,
  • UPON A CHILD THAT DIED
       Here she lies, a pretty bud,
  • UPON A DELAYING LADY
       Come, come away
  • UPON A MAID
       Here she lies, in bed of spice,
  • UPON A PAINTED GENTLEWOMAN
        Men say you're fair; and fair ye are, 'tis true;
  • UPON CUPID
       Love, like a gipsy, lately came,
  • UPON HER EYES
       Clear are her eyes,
  • UPON HER FEET
       Her pretty feet
  • UPON HIMSELF
       Thou shalt not all die; for while Love's fire shines
  • UPON HIS SISTER-IN-LAW, MISTRESS ELIZABETHHERRICK
       First, for effusions due unto the dead,
  • Upon Julia's Clothes
       Upon Julia's Clothes
  • UPON JULIA'S CLOTHES
       Whenas in silks my Julia goes,
  • UPON JULIA'S HAIR FILLED WITH DEW
       Dew sate on Julia's hair,
  • UPON JULIA'S RECOVERY
       Droop, droop no more, or hang the head,
  • UPON JULIA'S RIBBON
       As shews the air when with a rain-bow graced,
  • UPON JULIA'S VOICE
       When I thy singing next shall hear,
  • UPON LOVE
       A crystal vial Cupid brought,
  • UPON LOVE
       I held Love's head while it did ache;
  • UPON LOVE:BY WAY OF QUESTION AND ANSWER
       I bring ye love. QUES. What will love do?
  • UPON MAN
       Man is composed here of a twofold part;
  • UPON MRS ELIZ. WHEELER, UNDER THE NAME OFAMARILLIS
       Sweet Amarillis, by a spring's
  • UPON ROSES
       Under a lawn, than skies more clear,
  • UPON TEARS
       Tears, though they're here below the sinner's brine,
  • UPON THE DETRACTER
       I ask'd thee oft what poets thou hast read,
  • Upon The Loss Of His Mistresses
       I have lost, and lately, these
  • UPON THE LOSS OF HIS MISTRESSES
       I have lost, and lately, these
  • UPON TIME
       Time was upon
  • UPON WRINKLES
       Wrinkles no more are, or no less,
  • WANT
       Want is a softer wax, that takes thereon,
  • What Kind Of Mistress He Would Have
       Be the mistress of my choice,
  • When He Would Have His Verses Read
       In sober mornings do thou not rehearse
  • WHEN HE WOULD HAVE HIS VERSES READ
       In sober mornings, do not thou rehearse
  • WHY FLOWERS CHANGE COLOUR
       These fresh beauties, we can prove,
  • WlT PUNISHED PROSPERS MOST
       Dread not the shackles; on with thine intent,
  • WRITING
       When words we want, Love teacheth to indite;