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Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Elizabeth Wills (---.vc.shawcable.net)
Date: November 17, 2004 05:03PM

Anyone know info about the following bit of poetry?

A capital ship for a sailing ship was the Walloping Window Blind
The captain and crew......

thanks so much for any help


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: StephenFryer (---.l4.c3.dsl.pol.co.uk)
Date: November 17, 2004 05:58PM

The Walloping Window Blind
by
Charles E. Carryl

A capital ship for an ocean trip
Was the Walloping Window Blind.
No gale that blew dismayed her crew
Or troubled the captain's mind.

The man at the wheel was taught to feel
Contempt for the wildest blow.
And it often appeared when the weather had cleared
That he'd been in his bunk below.

The boatswain's mate was very sedate,
Yet fond of amusement too;
And he played hopscotch with the starboard watch
While the captain tickled the crew.

And the gunner we had was apparently mad
For he stood on the cannon's tail,
And fired salutes in the captain's boots
In the teeth of a booming gale.

The captain sat in a commodore's hat
And dined in a royal way
On toasted pigs and pickles and figs
And gummery bread each day.

But the rest of us ate from an odious plate
For the food that was given the crew
Was a number of tons of hot cross buns
Chopped up with sugar and glue.

We all felt ill as mariners will
On a diet that's cheap and rude,
And the poop deck shook when we dipped the cook
In a tub of his gluesome food.

Then nautical pride we laid aside,
And we cast the vessel ashore
On the Gulliby Isles, where the Poohpooh smiles
And the Anagzanders roar.

Composed of sand was that favored land
And trimmed in cinnamon straws;
And pink and blue was the pleasing hue
Of the Tickletoeteasers claws.

We climbed to the edge of a sandy ledge
And soared with the whistling bee,
And we only stopped at four o'clock
For a pot of cinnamon tea.

From dawn to dark, on rubagub bark
We fed, till we all had grown
Uncommonly thin. Then a boat blew in
On a wind from the torriby zone.

She was stubby and square, but we didn't much care,
And we cheerily put to sea.
We plotted a course for the Land of Blue Horse,
Due west 'cross the Peppermint Sea.

Stephen


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: marian2 (---.range81-152.btcentralplus.com)
Date: November 18, 2004 05:01AM

What a super and imaginative children's poem! I think Carryl ranks with Lear in terms of imagination, but is rather more consistent in the quality of his rhymes and scansions. I've not yet seen any Carryl that I didn't like, but quite a lot of Lear irritates and annoys me - he can be trite and breaks rules and stretches rhymes a bit too much quite frequently. On form, though, he's fantastic. However, Carryl's work is a lot less well known so any poorer stuff may have been seived out by time. Thanks for finding that one, Stephen, I haven't met it before and it's well up to standard!


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-05rh15-16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: November 18, 2004 06:41PM

Let us also not forget son Guy, named for his wife's surname, not the baby's predilection, I'm guessing.


The Sycophantic Fox and the Gullible Raven

A raven sat upon a tree,
And not a word he spoke, for
His beak contained a piece of Brie.
Or, maybe it was Roquefort.
We'll make it any kind you please --
At all events it was a cheese.

Beneath the tree's umbrageous limb
A hungry fox sat smiling;
He saw the raven watching him,
And spoke in words beguiling:
"J'admire," said he, "ton beau plumage!"
(The which was simply persiflage.)

Two things there are, no doubt you know,
To which a fox is used:
A rooster that is bound to crow,
A crow that's bound to roost;
And whichsoever he espies
He tells the most unblushing lies.

"Sweet fowl," he said, "I understand
You're more than merely natty;
I hear you sing to beat the band
And Adelina Patti.
Pray render with your liquid tongue
A bit from Gotterdammerung."

This subtle speech was aimed to please
The crow, and it succeeded;
He thought no bird in all the trees
Could sing as well as he did.
In flattery completely doused,
He gave the "Jewel Song" from Faust.

But gravitation's law, of course,
As Isaac Newton showed it,
Exerted on the cheese its force,
And elsewhere soon bestowed it.
In fact, there is no need to tell
What happened when to earth it fell.

I blush to add that when the bird
Took in the situation
He said one brief, emphatic word,
Unfit for publication.
The fox was greatly startled, but
He only sighed and answered, "Tut."

The Moral is: A fox is bound
To be a shameless sinner.
And also: When the cheese comes round
You know it's after dinner.
But (what is only known to few)
The fox is after dinner, too.
-- Guy Wetmore Carryl


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Joan Hilarides (---.247.181.62.gha.mi.chartermi.net)
Date: November 24, 2004 08:15PM

Thanks so much. My husband and I were discussing our school days of many years ago and I remembered memorizing this poem. He thought I was a bit toddy. Now I can show him I really wasn't ready for the old folks home.


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Henry (212.219.243.---)
Date: December 03, 2004 10:00AM

Can I offer another nautical yarn? The Yarn of the 'Nancy Bell' by W.S. Gilbert
It may interest some to know that the first of the series, "The Yarn of the Nancy Bell" was originally offered to "PUNCH" - to which I was, at that time, an occasional contributor. It was, however, declined by the then Editor, on the ground that it was "too cannibalistic for his readers' tastes."
W. S. Gilbert, Preface to 'Fifty "Bab" Ballads - Much Sound and Little Sense'

'Twas on the shores that round our coast
From Deal to Ramsgate span,
That I found alone on a piece of stone
An elderly naval man.

His hair was weedy, his beard was long,
And weedy and long was he,
And I heard this wight on the shore recite,
In a singular minor key:

"Oh, I am a cook and a captain bold,
And the mate of the Nancy brig,
And a bo'sun tight, and a midshipmite,
And the crew of the captain's gig."

And he shook his fists and he tore his hair,
Till I really felt afraid,
For I couldn't help thinking the man had been drinking,
And so I simply said:

"O, elderly man, it's little I know
Of the duties of men of the sea,
But I'll eat my hand if I understand
How you can possibly be

"At once a cook, and a captain bold,
And the mate of the Nancy brig,
And a bo'sun tight, and a midshipmite,
And the crew of the captain's gig."

Then he gave a hitch to his trousers, which
Is a trick all seamen larn,
And having got rid of a thumping quid,
He spun this painful yarn:

"'Twas in the good ship Nancy Bell
That we sailed to the Indian sea,
And there on a reef we come to grief,
Which has often occurred to me.

"And pretty nigh all o' the crew was drowned
(There was seventy-seven o' soul),
And only ten of the Nancy's men
Said 'Here!' to the muster-roll.

"There was me and the cook and the captain bold,
And the mate of the Nancy brig
And the bo'sun tight, and a midshipmite,
And the crew of the captain's gig.

"For a month we'd neither wittles nor drink,
Till a-hungry we did feel,
So we drawed a lot, and accordin' shot
The captain for our meal.

"The next lot fell to the Nancy's mate,
And a delicate dish he made;
Then our appetite with the midshipmite
We seven survivors stayed.

"And then we murdered the bo'sun tight,
And he much resembled pig,
Then we wittled free, did the cook and me,
On the crew of the captain's gig.

"Then only the cook and me was left,
And the delicate question, 'Which
Of us two goes to the kettle?' arose
And we argued it out as sich.

"For I Ioved that cook as a brother, I did,
And the cook he worshipped me;
But we'd both be blowed if we'd either be stowed
In the other chap's hold, you see.

"'I'll be eat if you dines off me,' says Tom,
'Yes, that,' says I, 'you'll be,' --
'I'm boiled if I die, my friend,' quoth I,
And 'Exactly so,' quoth he.

"Says he, 'Dear James, to murder me
Were a foolish thing to do,
For don't you see that you can't cook me,
While I can -- and will -- cook you!'

"So he boils the water, and takes the salt
And the pepper in portions true
(Which he never forgot) and some chopped shalot,
And some sage and parsley too.

"'Come here,' says he, with a proper pride,
Which his smiling features tell,
' 'Twill soothing be if I let you see,
How extremely nice you'll smell.'

"And he stirred it round and round and round,
And he sniffed at the foaming froth;
When I ups with his heels, and smothers his squeals
In the scum of the boiling broth.

"And I eat that cook in a week or less,
And -- as I eating be
The last of his chops, why, I almost drops,
For a wessel in sight I see!

"And I never grin, and I never smile,
And I never larf nor play,
But I sit and croak, and a single joke
I have -- which is to say:

"Oh, I am a cook and a captain bold,
And the mate of the Nancy brig,
And a bo'sun tight, and a midshipmite,
And the crew of the captain's gig!"


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-04rh16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: December 03, 2004 01:32PM

I take it a thumping quid is a splash of terbacky and not a noisy banknote.


Stephen
Posted by: ilza (---.162.243.76.user.ajato.com.br)
Date: December 09, 2004 04:44AM

hi,
it's funny, but my 1907 copy is slightly different ...
when I read this thread I did not recognize some words/lines ...

so I went to a copy of "The wit and humnor in America"(Marshall P. Wilder)
edited in 1907
volume 2 ( of 10)

the title of the poem reads "A nautical ballad"

The Walloping Window Blind
Charles E. Carryl

A capital ship for an ocean trip
Was the Walloping Window Blind
No gale that blew dismayed her crew
Or troubled the captain's mind.

The man at the wheel was taught to feel
Contempt for the wildest blow.
And it often appeared when the weather had cleared
That he'd been in his bunk below.

The boatswain's mate was very sedate,
Yet fond of amusement too;
And he played hopscotch with the starboard watch
While the captain tickled the crew.

And the gunner we had was apparently mad
For he stood on the cannon's tail, ...................for he SAT on the cannons's tail
And fired salutes in the captain's boots.................salutes WITH the captain's boots
In the teeth of a booming gale.

The captain sat in a commodore's hat
And dined in a royal way
On toasted pigs and pickles and figs
And gummery bread each day.

But the rest of us ate from an odious plate... But the cook was Dutch and behaved as such
For the food that was given the crew... For the diet he gave the crew
Was a number of tons of hot cross buns
Chopped up with sugar and glue....................Prepared with sugar and glue

The next stanza simply does not exist in my book .....
We all felt ill as mariners will
On a diet that's cheap and rude,
And the poop deck shook when we dipped the cook
In a tub of his gluesome food.

Then nautical pride we laid aside,... All nautical pride we laid aside
And we cast the vessel ashore
On the Gulliby Isles, where the Poohpooh smiles
And the Anagzanders roar..................And the Rumbletumbunders roar

The next stanza does not exist either ...
Composed of sand was that favored land
And trimmed in cinnamon straws;
And pink and blue was the pleasing hue
Of the Tickletoeteasers claws.

We climbed to the edge of a sandy ledge......... And we sat on the edge of a sandy ledge
And soared with the whistling bee,..... And shot at the whistling bee
And we only stopped at four o'clock.... And the cinnamon-bats wore water-proof hats
For a pot of cinnamon tea......... As they danced in the sounding sea

From dawn to dark, on rubagub bark....... On rubgub bark, from dawn to dark
We fed, till we all had grown
Uncommonly thin. Then a boat blew inUncommonly shrunk - when a Chinese junk
On a wind from the torriby zone........ Came by from the torriby zone

She was stubby and square, but we didn't much care,
And we cheerily put to sea.
We plotted a course for the Land of Blue Horse,.... And we left the crew of the junk to chew
Due west 'cross the Peppermint Sea...... The bark of the rubgub tree.

.............
Now, why do you think they are different ?!


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-05rh15-16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: December 09, 2004 12:51PM

Revisions, revisions. I have yet some other changes in a separate text, such as,

"For he sat on the after-rail"

And fired salutes in the captain's boots.................salutes WITH the captain's boots

That certainly makes more sense than firing IN them!

Your copy seems to be the earliest, though. And I envy your collection of light verse. I don't see the 'wit and humor' volumes in my local library, but it looks like $20.00 plus shipping will buy all ten of them. Worth it? How many pages are we getting here, I mean. And what percentage is light verse instead of stories? I would prefer the verse sections.

[dogbert.abebooks.com]


10 volumes
Posted by: ilza (---.162.243.76.user.ajato.com.br)
Date: December 09, 2004 05:34PM

well worth, in my opinion ...
a mix of stories and poems ( light verse)
10 x 15 cm only -
around 200 pages each, very compact though ...
I am copying you volume 2, and listing below some authors from the other 9 vols...

volume II
The two new houses ..................... story..............Carolyn Wells
Yes ?.............................................. short poem.....John Boyle O'Reilly
Fascination.................................... short poem......John B. Tabb
Barney McGee................................ poem...............Richard Hovey
The old deacon's version............... poem...............Frank L. Stanton
The two suitors............................. story................Carolyn Wells
The recruit......................................poem...............Robert W. Chambers
The beecher beached.....................poem...............John B. Tabb
Our best society............................story................George William Curtis
The two farmers............................story................Carolyn Wells
Samuel Brown................................poem...............Phoebe Cary
The way it wuz..............................poem................James Whitcomb Riley
She talked.....................................poem...............Sam Walter Foss
Grandma Keeler............................story.................Sarah P. McLean
Wallencamp
Vive la bagatelle............................poem...............Gelett Burgess
The two brothers..........................story.................Carolyn Wells
A letter..........................................story.................Petroleum V. Nasby (David R. Locke)
Familiar authors at work...............poem................Hayden Careuth
The lost word...............................poem.................John Paul
The Dutchman who had smallpox-story.................Henry P. Leland
Walk.............................................poem.................William Devere
Mr.Dooley on gold-seeking...........story..................Finley Peter Dunne
Love sonnets of a hoodlum..........poem.................Wallace Irwin
Plagiarism....................................poem.................John B. Tabb
How "Ruby"played......................story..................George W. Bagby
Go lightly, gal .............................poem.................Anne Virginia Culbertson
Comin'thu...................................poem.................Anne Virginia Culbertson
The golfer's Rubaiyat..................poem.................H. W. Boynton
Mr Dooley on reform candidates. story.................Finley Peter Dunne
An evenign musicale...................story.................May Isabel Fisk
Aunt Dinah's kitchen...................story................Harriet Beecher Stowe
The strike at Hinman's................story................Robert J. Burdette
A nautical ballad.................................................YEP - THAT ONE
Natural perversities...................poem.................James Whitcomb Riley
Budd Wilkins at the show...........poem...............S.E. Kiser
Ballad........................................poem..................Charles Godfrey Leland
The hoosier and the salt pile.....story................Danforth Marble
A rival entertainment.................story................Kate Field
Yawcob Strauss.........................poem...............Charles Follen Adams
Seffy and Sally...........................story................John Luther Long
An archaeological Congress......poem................Robert J. Burdette
A boy's view fo it.......................poem................Frank L. Stanton
Ringworm Frnak.........................poem...............James Whitcomb Riley
The colonel's clothes..................story...............Caroline Howard Gilman
The muskeeter..........................story................Josh Billings
The pettibone lineage...............story.................James T. Fields
Why moles have hands.............story.................Anne Virginia Culbertson
A psalm of life...........................poem.................Phoebe Cary
An odyssey of K's.....................poem.................Wilbur D. Nesbit
Stage whispers.......................poem..................Carolyn Wells
The deacon's trout...................story.................. Henry Ward Beecher
Enough...................................poem...................Tom Masson
The fighting race.....................poem...................Joseph I.C. Clarke
The organ..............................story.....................Henry Ward Beecher
The turnings of a bookworm.. poem .................Carolyn Wells
My grandmother's turkey-tail fan... poem ..........Samuel Minturn Peck
The British matron..................story....................Nathaniel Hawthorne

...
Charles Follen Adams
George Ade
Max Adeler
Thomas Bailey Aldrich
Nina R. Allen
Wallace Bruce Amsbary
Jack Appleton
Bill Arp
George W. Bagby
James Montgomery Bailey
Joseph G. Baldwin
JohnKendrick Bangs
Frank Roe Batchelder
Billy Baxter
Charlotte Becker
Henry Ward Beecher
J. V. Belden
Josh Billings
H. W. Boynton
Madeline Bridges
William Cullen Bryant
Robert J. Burdette
Gelett Burgess
Ellis Parker Butler
William Allen Butler
Henry Guy Carleton
Bliss Carman
Hayden Carruth
Charles E. Carryl
Phoebe Cary
John Challing
Robert W. Chambers
George Randolph Chester
Joseph I. C. Clarke
Samuel L. Clemens .... yep ...
Helen Avery Cone
Edmund Vance Cooke
Ellen Mackay Cortissoz
Kenyon Cox
Frederick Cozzens
Frank Crane
Porte Crayon
Anne Virginia Culbertson
George William Curtis
Mary Stewart Cutting
Alan Dale
John James Davies
Holman F. Day
William Devere
Major Jack Downing
William Henry Drummond
Finley Peter Dunne
Edward Eggleston
Ralph Waldo Emerson
Eugene Field
Kate Field
James T. Fields
Henry J. Finn
May Isabel Fisk
James Montgomery Flagg
Elliott Flower
J. W. Foley
James L. Ford
Sewell Ford
Sam Walter Foss
Benjamin franklin
Strickland Gillilan
Caroline Howard Gilman
Charlotte Gilman
David Gray
Alfred Gorton Greene
Roy Farrell Greene
Sarah P. McLean Greene
John Habberton
Edward Everett Hale
Lucretia Hale
Baynard Rust Hall
Gail Hamilton
Henry Harland
Joel Chandler Harris
Kennett Harris
Bret Harte
Jennie Betts Hartswick
Nathaniel Hawthorne
John Hay
O. Henry
Oliver Herford
Oliver Wendell Holmes
J.J. Hooper
Emerson Houhh
Richard Hovet
E. W. Howe
William Dean Howells
Ironquill
Washington Irving
Wallace Irwin
Charles F. Johnson
Reginald Kauffman
J. F. Kelley
Myra Kelly
S.E. Kiser
J. Proctor Knott
A. H. Laidlaw
William J. Lampton
George Thomas Lanigan
Ring Lardner
E. O. Laughlin
Charles Godfrey Leland
Henry P./ Leland
Eliza Leslie
Alfred Henry Lewis
John Luther Long
Henry Wadsworh Londfellow
A. B. Longstreet
Charles Battell Loomis
George Horace Lorimer
James Russell Lowell
Charles F. Lummis
Frances Lynde
May McHenry
Hugh McHugh
Joh T. McIntyre
Charles Vernon Macauley
Alice MacGowan
Harold MacGrath
Danforth Marble
Don Marquis
Tom Masson
William Vaughn Moody
George P. Morris
R. K. Munkittrick
C. W. M.
Petroleum V. Nasby ( David R. Locke)
James Ball Naylor
Elizabeth Hyer Neff
Wilbur Nesbit
Meredith Nicholson
Alden Noble
Bill Nye
Daniel O'Connell
John Boyle O'Reilly
Lloyd Osbourne
John Paul
Samuel Minturn Peck
Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
John Phoenix
Warwick S. Price
M. Quad
Herbert Quick
Carroll Watson Rankin
Opie Read
Wallace Rice
James Whitcomb Riley
Doane Robinson
James Jeffrey Roche
Katharine M. Roof
Ray Clarke Rose
Edwin L. Sabin
John G. Saxe
Clinton Scottlard
Horace E Scudder
B.P. Shillaber
Henry A. Shute
Edward Rowland Sill
Sam Slick
Maurice Smiley
F. Smith
Sol Smith
John Philip Sousa
Harriet Spofford
Frank L. Stanton
Edmund Clarence Stedman
Benjamin Stevenson
Sam S. Stinson
Harriet Beecher Stowe
Howard V Sutherland John B Tabb
Bayard Taylor
Benjamin F Taylor
Bert Leston Taylor
Octave Thanet
Ernest Lawrence Thayer
Thomas Bangs Thorpe
Juliet Wilbor Tompkins
Edward W Towsend
J T Trowbridges
MaryF Tucker
Artemus Ward
Anne Warner
Charles Dudley Warner
Stanley Waterloo
Nixon Waterman
Carolyn Wells
J. K. Wetherill
Frances Whicher
Walt Whitman
John Greenleaf Whittier
Marshall P Wilder
Owen Wister
Thomas Ybarra
.
oh, boy, I longed for a "copy and paste" chance ...


Re: 10 volumes
Posted by: ilza (---.162.243.76.user.ajato.com.br)
Date: December 09, 2004 05:36PM

sorry - I tried to make it neat, and it went bananas ...


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-04rh16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: December 10, 2004 12:57PM

And durned nice of you, thanks! I'll have to get you a scanner for Christmas and air freight it down to São Paulo. Wit & Humor seems worth the bucks, all right. And I have been wanting to get a copy of the Portable Dorothy Parker, anyway. What else to include? Now that I have to spend the money on postage anyway, that is.


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Bradley Mull (4.16.57.---)
Date: December 23, 2004 05:02PM

This is fantastic, I remember this as a song in my older sisters school book from elementary school, and I've been singing it too my daughters for years, she has been begging me to write it down. I remember it having a chorus that went....

So blow you winds hi ho a roving I will go
I'll stay no more on the English shore
So let the music play
I'm off on a morning train across the raging main
I'm off too my love with a boxing glove
Ten thousand miles away



This is from memory 30 years ago so there are no guarantees.


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Henry (212.219.243.---)
Date: December 30, 2004 12:20PM


Re: Baynard Hall in Ilza index
Posted by: Dixie (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date: February 12, 2005 04:13AM


That's Baynard Rush Hall (as in Dr. Benjamin Rush),
not Baynard Rust Hall.


Re: Baynard Hall in Ilza index
Posted by: ilza (---.162.245.109.user.ajato.com.br)
Date: February 14, 2005 07:44AM

you are right of course
- and I am sure there are more typos to my list
except ... that this is not one of mine !

his name is mentioned 3 times ( the index itself plus 2 articles) , always as Rust
3 typos !
a record ?


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Nancy Charlton (---.client.comcast.net)
Date: February 15, 2005 02:49PM

Yes, I remember that too, but more like 50+ years ago. When I was in 7th grade the music teacher had a local baritone of some note come and conduct a singing session for us. (He had been in the high school operettas and was the son of a judge, was back in town--Bellingham WA--for a spell after college, and he filled in as soloist at my church.) I carry the memory of this pompous and stately gentleman standing upright, and with the gestures taught in classical rhetoric, intoning "Then blow ye winds, heigh-ho! . . ." We went around singing it for weeks, often with a snigger; I don't know about the other girls, but years later I still chuckle at what I now know as comic incongruity. He was equally good with crowd-pleasing sacred solos such as The Holy City ("Je-ROO-salem"), on the order of Richard Tucker's very dramatic rendition.

Thanks, those who posted the words. I'll add it to my collection of loony songs, along with The Irish Rover, Nell Flaherty's Drake, The Ship Titanic.


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Drisanna (---.rtchrd01.md.comcast.net)
Date: February 16, 2005 09:25AM

I remember The Walloping Window Blind as a song also, from a children's album I played endlessly when I was a kid (40ish years ago). I was singing it to my youngest son this morning, couldn't remember all the words, so I came looking here. Thank you all so much for filling in the gaps of my senility!

On the same album were other humorous children's songs, set to well known tunes. Rather like a Wierd Al Yankovich for kids. smiling smiley I also fondly remember "On Top of Spaghetti" and another called (I think) "Dunderbeck."

Oh Dunderbeck oh Dunderbeck
How could you be so mean
To ever have invented the sausage meat machine
Now all the neighbors, cats and dogs will never more be seen
'Cause they've been ground to sausage meat in Dunderbeck's machine.

One day a little fat boy came walking in the store
He bought a pound of sausages and laid them on the floor
Then he began to whistle
He whistled up a tune
And all the little sausages went dancing 'round the room.

One day the machine got busted, the darned thing wouldn't work
So Dunderbeck he crawled inside to see what made it jerk
His wife she had a nightmare
She was walking in her sleep
She gave the crank as whickity-whack and Dunderbeck was meat.

There were other verses, too, but again senility is at work. Does anybody else remember this album or know where I might get a copy of it?


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Dorothy P. Wonder (---.snfccasy.dynamic.covad.net)
Date: March 08, 2005 04:10PM

At coffee this morning with a small group of women of assorted ages, one who is well into her '90s sang a version of "a capital ship. . .walloping window blind". I logged on to see if I could get the rest of it - and whoopee - I hit pay dirt! Can anyone supply me with specific reference to find the music- or perhaps I have not read all the above entries thoroughly?


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Henry (194.150.176.---)
Date: March 22, 2005 01:40PM

It was probably sung to the tune of this folk song;

Ten Thousand Miles Away

From Shanties from the Seven Seas, Hugill
According to Hugill, started out as a shore ballad sung by street singers in Ireland, early 1800s. Then became a popular music hall number. "A Capital Ship" (Carryl?) was based on this. RG

Sing ho! for a brave an' a gallant ship,
An' a fast an' fav'rin' breeze,
Wi' a bully crew an' a cap'n to
To carry me over the seas;
To carry me over the seas, me boys,
To me true love far away,
For I'm takin' a trip on a Government ship
Ten thousand miles away.

cho: Then blow, ye winds and blow!
An' a-rovin' I will go.
I'll stay no more on England's shore
To hear sweet music play*
For I'm on the move to me own true love
Ten thousand miles away.

I expect we'll hear it at the Lancaster Maritime Festival in Lancashire over Easter.


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-04rh16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: March 23, 2005 12:22PM

Good to know, thanks!


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Brian H (207.6.250.---)
Date: August 24, 2008 07:59AM

I have more recalled alterations, which seem to scan better:

The Walloping Window Blind
by
Charles E. Carryl

A capital ship for an ocean trip
Was the Walloping Window Blind.
No gale that blew dismayed her crew
Or troubled the captain's mind.
The man at the wheel assayed to feel
Contempt for the wildest blow-oh-oh ...
For it often appeared when the gale had cleared
That he'd been in his bunk below.

--Chorus
So blow ye winds, heigh-ho!
A-sailing I will go;
I'll stay no more on England's shore,
So let the music play, hey, hey; (--play-ay-ay)
I'm off to my love
With a boxing glove
Ten thousand miles away!

The ca[tain's mate was very sedate,
Yet fond of amusement, too;
He played hop-scotch with the starboard watch
While the captain tickled the crew.
The gunner we had was apparently mad
For he sat on the after ra-ay-ail ...,
And fired salutes with the captain's boots
In the teeth of the roaring gale.

--Chorus--

///

But I don't recall ever singing the other verses mentioned.


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Brian H (207.6.250.---)
Date: August 24, 2008 08:00AM

Oops;
"captain's mate", of course, not ca[tain's.


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: JoeInLA (166.129.131.---)
Date: September 24, 2008 10:20AM

It's amazing how some things stick in your head (and what useful things they are too!). I remember reading this poem more than 40 years ago (I'm 52) in one of a series of children's books.

While I distinctly remember specific lines from the original version that ilza posted above ("chopped up with sugar and glue"), I also remember specific lines from the different version he (or she) found ("fired salutes with the captain's boots" and "pink and blue was the pleasing hue Of the Tickletoeteasers claws"). What's more, I remember the tune to which it was sung (which for some reason has been running through my head for the last couple of days), so I must have heard it on a children's record as well.

My guess is that at some point the author revised the original poem, and both versions ended up in print. (I know this happened with that beautiful poem that begins "Do not stand at my grave and weep,...") The editors of the book I read may even have taken the liberty of combined the two versions as they saw fit. The poem was likely altered even further when it was set to music.

(As an aside, it's incredible that I can run an Internet search at 5:30 a.m. and instantly come across these posts, some of which are four years old! It's like carrying on a conversation across time. Awesome.)


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: Brian H (207.6.250.---)
Date: September 24, 2008 03:35PM

Joe,I think you have it about right. There are multiple valid versions. Anyway, I have 50-yr old memories of a class having rollickin' good fun with this song. It was very interesting here to have my faint suspicion confirmed that the background of this had something to do with the exiling of felons to Australia.

I'd imagine that if one had intimate knowledge of the local politics etc. of the time that many of the fantasmagorical details in the latter verses had specific meanings.


Re: Walloping Window Blind
Posted by: JoeInLA (166.129.131.---)
Date: September 25, 2008 01:26AM

Okay, you are not going to believe this. I was remembering the great illustrations that accompanied the poem, and wishing I could find them again, or at least find who the illustrator was. I was pretty sure I saw the poem in one of a series of books called "Best in Children's Books," and seeing as how I found this site so quickly, decided to try running a search using the name of the series. Lo and behold, I got it on the very first hit!

"Volume 34 (1960)
Snow White and Rose Red by Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm, illustrated by Idellete Bordigoni (1-21).
America's Wonderful National Parks by Gladys Schwarcz, illustrated by Leonard Weisgard (22-45).
Little Fellow by Marguerite Henry, illustrated by Phoebe Erickson (46-65).
Frederick Barbarossa by James Baldwin, illustrated by Ruth Ives (66-75).
Capital Ship by Charles Edward Carryl, illustrated by Robin Jacques (76-84).
Old Whirlwind by Elizabeth Coatsworth, illustrated by Manning de V. Lee (85-116).
Mouse with Bobbed Whiskers by Rose Fyleman, illustrated by Paul Galdone (117-124).
Dangerous Day for Mrs. Doodlepunk by Dorothy Dodworth, illustrated by Jill Elgin (125-140).
Heart of the Band by Harriet E. Huntington, illustrated by Polly Jackson (141-155).
Let's Go to Five Little Countries illustrated with photos (156-160)."

Boy do those story titles bring back memories. Unfortunately I wasn't able to find the illustrations Jacques created for the poem, but if you're interested you can see samples of his work at the following link: [jetse.dse.nl] />
I also ran across the following information re the author:

"This wonderful nonsense song was a poem by American Charles Edward Carryl. ...
It is based on the folk song Ten Thousand Miles. Carryl was a New York stock broker who started writing fantasy stories for his own children. ... At the time of his death in 1920, the works of Carryl were still in print and widely read. If Carryl is to be remembered for any one contribution to American children's literature, it should be that he, more than any other American children's fantasist of the past century, found a key to successful nonsense fantasy so long thought to be the exclusive property of the British.
Douglas Street, The Dictionary of Literary Biography"

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 09/25/2008 01:28AM by JoeInLA.




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