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what did you do for freedom today?
Posted by: katie (---.226.42.236.Dial1.Dallas1.Level3.net)
Date: November 16, 2004 08:40PM

I need help finding a favorite poem from my boyfriends childhood. I believe is either starts with or has repeated in it the phrase 'What did you do for freedom today?' I think maybe it was from around the vietnam era but am not certain. He also mentioned phrases about 'those boys that flew the bombers' and concepts about young men going to war knowing they are not to return. If you have any idea about where I could find this poem (preferably before Christmas) I would greatly appreciate it.


Re: what did you do for freedom today?
Posted by: marian2 (---.range81-152.btcentralplus.com)
Date: November 17, 2004 04:52AM

The only thing I can find is a second World War poster with a bit of writing on, which may be a short poem - but I can't enlarge the picture to make out exactly what it says, so I am not sure - the heading on the poster is "What did you do today for Freedom. If you want to look - it's at [www.slinkard.com]


Re: what did you do for freedom today?
Posted by: ilza (---.162.243.237.user.ajato.com.br)
Date: November 17, 2004 06:25AM

it is a 1943 poem, from "Power" an engineering magazine
issue of August 1943, author unknown

The last lines are not very clear to me,
so I still have to check them better ...


What did you do for Freedom today?
A Marine on Guadalcanal.
Through a hail of lead and jungle hell,
Crept out to a wounded pal;
And lie dragged him back through the slime and muck,
Then, with never a thought of rest,
Back over that deadly route he went
And smashed a machine-gun nest.
It wasn't much fun — the bullets — the mud-
He may'h'ave men scared, but he hid it;
He onlv knew of a job to do
And he didn't quibble, he did it
What did you do for Freedom today?
"All that you could." Think well—
One-millionth as much as that Leatherneck did?
—They buried the boy where he fell.

What did you do for Freedom today?
A Gob oh a rubber raft
Drained the last wet drop from his water flash
Then threw.it .away and laughed. ,. . ,
For eighteen days on an endless sea
In a torment of pain he lay;
Drenched and chilled to the bone at night,
And burned to a crisp by day/
He wanted to live, but he knew in his heart
That the odds were a thousand to one;
But he drifted and hoped, consoled by a prayer,
And the thought of a job well done.
What did you do for Freedom tckjay?
"All that you could," yon declare.
But when you say it, remember the Gob
Who died on the roft out there.

What did you do for Freedom today?
Nine lads in a B-17
Ran into a flock of Messerschmitts
And died in their wrecked machine.
Oh, they didn't do bad with what they had,
But they flew through hell to do it;
They had smashed Berlin and a dozen "one-ten
But their number was up and they knew it.
They were full of holes, with no controls,
And their ship was a comet of flame;
But they stuck to their guns and the useless stick
And battled on just the same.
What did you do for Fredom today?
"All that you coirld." O.K.;
But if those nine boys in the B-17
Were to ask you, What would you say?

What did you do for Freedom today?
I think they've a right to ask.
You're in this fight just as much as they,
And with just as important a task.
Were you at your desk, or bench, or press,
And at work at the starting bell?
Did every minute of this day count?
And the job — did you do it well?
Did you buy a Bond or a Stamp today
Or collect any scrap for the pile?
Did you save your grease or throw it Sway?
Did you drive just an extra mile?
Have you been down to the Red Cross Bank
And given a pint of your blood?

( the following lines are not very clear )
Did you send that V-letter today?
Did you hoard any rationed food?
Before you begin to complain and gripe
That life is all work and no fun—
Would you trade dinner for Ration K?
....... for a gun
... a while today
.......
.......
.... B17
....................................................................................
I will revert as soon as these lines are clear
sorry


Re: what did you do for freedom today?
Posted by: ilza (---.162.246.59.user.ajato.com.br)
Date: November 19, 2004 08:09AM

so sorry, there is a "black shadow" over the page, and I cannot read its end ...

it is a 1943 poem, from "Power" an engineering magazine
issue of August 1943, author unknown


What did you do for Freedom today?
A Marine on Guadalcanal.
Through a hail of lead and jungle hell,
Crept out to a wounded pal;
And lie dragged him back through the slime and muck,
Then, with never a thought of rest,
Back over that deadly route he went
And smashed a machine-gun nest.
It wasn't much fun — the bullets — the mud-
He may'h'ave men scared, but he hid it;
He onlv knew of a job to do
And he didn't quibble, he did it
What did you do for Freedom today?
"All that you could." Think well—
One-millionth as much as that Leatherneck did?
—They buried the boy where he fell.

What did you do for Freedom today?
A Gob on a rubber raft
Drained the last wet drop from his water flash
Then threw it away and laughed ...
For eighteen days on an endless sea
In a torment of pain he lay;
Drenched and chilled to the bone at night,
And burned to a crisp by day
He wanted to live, but he knew in his heart
That the odds were a thousand to one;
But he drifted and hoped, consoled by a prayer,
And the thought of a job well done.
What did you do for Freedom tckjay?
"All that you could," yon declare.
But when you say it, remember the Gob
Who died on the roft out there.

What did you do for Freedom today?
Nine lads in a B-17
Ran into a flock of Messerschmitts
And died in their wrecked machine.
Oh, they didn't do bad with what they had,
But they flew through hell to do it;
They had smashed Berlin and a dozen "one-ten
But their number was up and they knew it.
They were full of holes, with no controls,
And their ship was a comet of flame;
But they stuck to their guns and the useless stick
And battled on just the same.
What did you do for Fredom today?
"All that you could." O.K.;
But if those nine boys in the B-17
Were to ask you, What would you say?

What did you do for Freedom today?
I think they've a right to ask.
You're in this fight just as much as they,
And with just as important a task.
Were you at your desk, or bench, or press,
And at work at the starting bell?
Did every minute of this day count?
And the job — did you do it well?
Did you buy a Bond or a Stamp today
Or collect any scrap for the pile?
Did you save your grease or throw it Sway?
Did you drive just an extra mile?
Have you been down to the Red Cross Bank
And given a pint of your blood?

Did you send that V-letter today?
Did you hoard any rationed food?
Before you begin to complain and gripe
That life is all work and no fun—
Would you trade dinner for Ration K?
....... everytime pay for a gun
........ every one in a while today
......... hard and lean,
....... of a Gob and a L ...,
.... boys in a B-17


Re: what did you do for freedom today?
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-04rh16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: November 19, 2004 12:49PM

Hmmm ... is that what they call 'foxing' (when one reads descriptions about the quality of old books)?


Re: what did you do for freedom today?
Posted by: ilza (---.162.246.59.user.ajato.com.br)
Date: November 19, 2004 03:54PM

kind of, except this is a 1943 newspaper copy...


Re: what did you do for freedom today?
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-02rh15-16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: November 21, 2004 02:06PM

How in the world did you ever find a 1943 newsp ... oh, I get it, that newspaper archive site. Cool.


Re: what did you do for freedom today?
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-03rh16rt-04rh15rt.co.dial-access.att.ne)
Date: November 22, 2004 12:29PM

I see now there may be a reason to pay for these searches. Here it shows the author as Ray Falkinburg, but it won't let me read it without a login:

[tinyurl.com]


Hugh
Posted by: ilza (---.162.246.59.user.ajato.com.br)
Date: November 22, 2004 01:03PM

you can always try it for 2 days - for free
( I did, and then I joined it because I am doing a very specific research ...)

it reads:
No one can read the passage below without feeling
more than ever, his own personal responsibility in this
war. To most of us it is a sharp, telling right to the chin.
It is taken from "Power" an engineering magazine issue
of August 1943, was dritten by a war worker,
was handed to us by Ray Falkinbnrg.




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