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British naval poetry
Posted by: Rafael (---.paradise.net.nz)
Date: November 05, 2004 05:02PM

very British poem, naval heroes from time of the armada, the line 'Drake, Frobisher, Hawkins and Howard'


Re: British naval poetry
Posted by: lg (---.ca.charter.com)
Date: November 05, 2004 06:03PM

The Armada, July 1588
by Beryl Barnett



The Armada was coming out, went the cry,
The Armada was coming and men would die
For the last time Drake had raided the Spanish Main
Out for revenge was Phillip of Spain.
By Elizabeth’s hand, Mary Queen of Scots was dead,
His vengeance now was something to dread.
He was the heir to the English throne,
Not Elizabeth- the heretical crone.

The Armada was coming out, went the cry,
The Armada was coming and many would die.

Lord Howard of Effingham knelt before his Queen,
He took off the feathered hat, of deepest green.
With his white ruff framing his strong bearded face
Dressed in velvet robes - his sword in place.
Elizabeth gave him command of the fleet,
But Drakes drum was calling - listen to the beat?

The Armada was coming out, went the cry,
But the English were ready, and standing nigh.

In the south of England, beacons, set in place,
Ships were recalled, and came back in haste
To anchor in deep water, just off Plymouth Sound -
When was sighted near the Scilliies the Armada, England bound.

The Armada was here, out went the call,
England once more had its back to the wall.

The Spanish ships formed crescent shape,
their sails a-billowing, gun ports agape.
Cannon balls belching smoke, left and right.
Was this smoke a fire ship? The Spanish scattered in fright.
The ships danced to the tune of the winds and waves,
As up and down the channel ships the weather braved

The Armada was here, out went the call,
Drake, Hawkins, and Frobisher banished them all.

After five days of fighting, and scattered by squalls,
The wind, West by South West, waves like grey walls,
Howard pursued the Spanish westward around the British Isles,
The journey of the remaining ships full of misery and sighs.
In September, sixty seven ships painfully limped home.
The Spanish would not come again, while Elizabeth's on the throne.


Les


Re: British naval poetry
Posted by: Rafael (---.paradise.net.nz)
Date: November 07, 2004 12:59AM

Thanks, Les. It's a rousing poem and I'll file it but it's not the one I'm trying to locate which, I think, was not written by a contemporary author. Probably 19th century. The one I remember was in a school poetry book.


Re: British naval poetry
Posted by: IanB (---.tnt11.mel1.da.uu.net)
Date: November 08, 2004 04:10PM

Rafael, the one you are probably thinking of is 'Admirals All' by Henry Newbolt:


Effingham, Grenville, Raleigh, Drake,
Here's to the bold and free!
Benbow, Collingwood, Byron, Blake,
Hail to the Kings of the Sea!
Admirals all, for England's sake,
Honour be yours and fame!
And honour, as long as waves shall break,
To Nelson's peerless name!

Admirals all, for England's sake,
Honour be yours and fame!
And honour, as long as waves shall break,
To Nelson's peerless name!

Essex was fretting in Cadiz Bay
With the galleons fair in sight;
Howard at last must give him his way,
And the word was passed to fight.
Never was schoolboy gayer than he,
Since holidays first began:
He tossed his bonnet to wind and sea,
And under the guns he ran.

Drake nor devil nor Spaniard feared,
Their cities he put to the sack;
He singed His Catholic Majesty's beard,
And harried his ships to wrack.
He was playing at Plymouth a rubber of bowls
When the great Armada came;
But he said, "They must wait their turn, good souls,"
And he stooped and finished the game.

Fifteen sail were the Dutchmen bold,
Duncan he had but two;
But he anchored them fast where the Texel shoaled,
And his colours aloft he flew.
"I've taken the depth to a fathom," he cried,
"And I'll sink with a right good will:
For I know when we're all of us under the tide
My flag will be fluttering still."

Splinters were flying above, below,
When Nelson sailed the Sound:
"Mark you, I wouldn't be elsewhere now,"
Said he, "for a thousand pound!"
The Admiral's signal bade him fly
But he wickedly wagged his head:
He clapped the glass to his sightless eye,
And "I'm damned if I see it!" he said.

Admirals all, they said their say
(The echoes are ringing still).
Admirals all, they went their way
To the haven under the hill.
But they left us a kingdom none can take --
The realm of the circling sea --
To be ruled by the rightful sons of Blake,
And the Rodneys yet to be.

Admirals all, for England's sake,
Honour be yours and fame!
And honour, as long as waves shall break,
To Nelson's peerless name!



Post Edited (11-08-04 15:11)


Re: British naval poetry
Posted by: Rafael (---.paradise.net.nz)
Date: November 24, 2004 05:14AM

Thank you, Ian B. I appreciate your assistance. It has the rhythm and the tone but it's not the one I remember. Regards, Rafael.


Re: British naval poetry
Posted by: M'lady (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date: November 26, 2004 10:47PM

I am looking for 2 poems, if you have any idea how to help me. I am new to this! One is called "the Invictus" I THINK, and the other is not a naval poem, but a wedding poem of which I can only remember bits and have had no success in searching.

I wed thee forever,
not for the sham of earth's brief years
etc
etc
etc
when life's (or love's?) flame flickers and burns low

Is all I can remember. I notice that "Les" seems to be a good searcher and would like to contact him. Thanks.


Re: British naval poetry
Posted by: IanB (---.tnt11.mel1.da.uu.net)
Date: November 27, 2004 03:59AM

M'lady, these requests of yours are not appropriately posted in the thread for 'British naval poetry'!

You'll have a better chance of someone answering, if you click on New Topic at the top of this thread, and then re-post your requests in the resulting new thread under a title indicating your subject.

Ian

I now see that Les has moved your post for you. See the thread titled 'Invictus'.



Post Edited (11-27-04 03:16)


Re: British naval poetry
Posted by: IanB (---.tnt11.mel1.da.uu.net)
Date: November 27, 2004 04:10AM

I was being presumptuous, Rafael. Drake was the only one of Newbolt's 'admirals' who fought the Armada.

You have aroused my curiosity. My Internet searches have not found any poem with the line you quoted. Can you remember any other lines or distinctive phrases or words from the poem you are looking for, or even approximately how long the poem was?

If it featured in a school book in New Zealand, it must be something reasonably well known, or by a well known author. That's why I assumed it was 'Admirals All', which I recall being in several of the poetry books used in my school days.

Is there any chance of finding a copy of your school book in a New Zealand library?

Ian


Re: British naval poetry
Posted by: marian2 (---.range81-152.btcentralplus.com)
Date: November 27, 2004 04:29AM

If it has the rhythm and tone of Admirals All it might be a parody or pasticheof it, so looking in parody books might find it - it's a long shot, though.




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