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Flying Fish
Posted by: Robyn P (---.b.003.pth.iprimus.net.au)
Date: June 20, 2003 10:00AM

Could someone tell me who wrote this poem?:-
_______________________________________________________
Said the Shark to the Flying Fish over the phone
"will you join me tonight? I am dining alone.

Let me order a nice little dinner for two.
And come as you are in your shimmering blue."

Said the Flying Fish, "fancy remembering me,
and the dress that I wore to the porpoise's tea".

"How could I forget" said the Shark in his guile.
"I'll expect you at eight", and rang off with a smile.

She has powdered her nose, she has put on her things,
she is off with one flap of her luminous wings.

Oh little one, lovely, light hearted and vain,
the moon will not shine on your beauty again.
________________________________________________________
Desperate.
Have spent 3/4 of a day (solid) searching the internet - no luck so far.

Thanks


Re: Author of children's poem
Posted by: Les (---.trlck.ca.charter.com)
Date: June 20, 2003 11:21AM

It was written by Emile Rieu, or E. V. Rieu

It was a poem, called "The Flattered Flying Fish", by Emile Rieu.

Said the Shark to the Flying Fish over the phone;
"Will you join me tonight?, For I'm dining alone.
Let me order a nice little dinner for two,
And come as you are in your shimmering blue!"
Said the Flying Fish: "Fancy HE remembering ME,
And ther dress that I wore to the porpoises' Tea!"
"How could I forget?" said the Shark in his guile;
"I'll expect you at eight!",and rang off with a smile.

She has powdered her nose, she has put on her things;
She is off with one flap of her luminous wings....


Oh! little one, lovely, light-hearted and vain,
The Moon will not shine on your beauty again!

Les


Re: Author of children's poem
Posted by: marian2 (---.in-addr.btopenworld.com)
Date: June 20, 2003 11:58AM

Noce bit of nonsense, Robyn, thanks for posting it. I was about to suggest Lewis Carroll or a parody of Carroll, when I read Les's post - it strongly reminds me of The Walrus and The Carpenter and also something about an oyster sugaring her hair. Could Rieu have been into pastiche?


Re: Author of children's poem
Posted by: Tigermonkey (---.in-addr.btopenworld.com)
Date: July 17, 2003 06:48PM

Rieu certainly had his dafter side - as well as being a distinguished classicist and publisher (founder editor of The Penguin Classics from 1944-1964, translated numerous works notably Homer's Odyssey) also wrote other little oddities such as Sir Smasham Uppe:

Good afternoon, Sir Smasham Uppe!
We're having tea: do take a cup!
Sugar and milk? Now let me see-
Two lumps, I think?...Good gracious me!
The silly thing slipped off your knee!
Pray don't apologise, old chap;
A very trivial mishap!
So clumsy of you? How absurd!
My dear Sir Smasham, not a word!
Now do sit down and have another,
And tell us all about your brother-
You know, the one who broke his head.
Is that poor fellow still in bed?-
A chair - allow me, sir!...Great Scott!
That was a nasty smash! Eh, what?
Oh, not at all: the chair was old-
Queen Anne, or so we have been told.
We've got at least a dozen more:
Just leave the pieces on the floor.
I want you admire our view:
Come nearer to the window, do;
And look how beautiful...Tut, tut!
You didn't see that it was shut?
I hope you are not badly cut!
Not hurt? A fortunate escape!
Amazing! Not a single scrape!
And now, if you have finished tea,
I fancy you might like to see
A little thing or two I've got.
That china plate? Yes, worth a lot:
A beauty too...Ah, there it goes!
I trust it didn't hurt your toes?
Your elbow brushed it off the shelf?
Of course: I've done the same myself.
And now, my dear Sir Smasham - Oh,
You surely don't intend to go?
You must be off? Well, come again.
So glad you're fond of porcelain!


Re: Author of children's poem
Posted by: dennis (---.gardena-05rh15rt.ca.dial-access.att.net)
Date: July 18, 2003 11:06AM

The poem both didactic and sing-songy is very fine. I appreciate both
the simple lesson and the easy read. It's Alexandrine I believe-
with an interesting couplet at the end. very well written. Thanks dlc


Book of Poems
Posted by: Jo Watts (---.atlaga.adelphia.net)
Date: September 21, 2003 04:32PM

Can you help me find a book by" Helen Steimer Rice"?

I think the name was" Book of Poems" and one of the Poems was

"This to shall pass"
Thank You


Re: Author of children's poem
Posted by: -Les- (---.trlck.ca.charter.com)
Date: September 21, 2003 06:39PM

Jo, you get better results if you start a brand new thread rather than tack your request on the bottom of another person's post. This link may help you.
It contains many of Helen Steiner Rice's poems.

[www.absolutelypoetry.com] />

Les


more Rieu ...
Posted by: ilza (---.162.226.12.sao.ajato.com.br)
Date: September 22, 2003 07:18AM

E. V. Rieu ( Emile Victor 1887-1972)

Hall and Knight
or 'z + b + x = y + b + z'

When he was young his cousins used to say of Mr Knight:
'This boy will write an algebra - or looks as if he might.'
And sure enough, when Mr Knight had grown to be a man,
He purchased pen and paper and an inkpot, and began.

But he very soon discovered that he couldn't write at all,
And his heart was filled with yearnings for a certain Mr Hall;
Till, after many years of doubt, he sent his friend a card:
'Have tried to write an Algebra, but find it very hard.'

Now Mr Hall himself had tried to write a book for schools,
But suffered from a handicap: he didn't know the rules.
So when he heard from Mr Knight and understood his gist,
He answered him by telegram: 'Delighted to assist.'

So Mr Hall and Mr Knight they took a house together,
And they worked away at algebra in any kind of weather,
Determined not to give up until they had evolved
A problem so constructed that it never could be solved.

'How hard it is', said Mr Knight, 'to hide the fact from youth
That x and y are equal: it is such an obvious truth!'
'It is', said Mr Hall, 'but if we gave a b to each,
We'd put the problem well beyond our little victims' reach.

'Or are you anxious, Mr Knight, lest any boy should see
The utter superfluity of this repeated b?'
'I scarcely fear it', he replied, and scratched this grizzled head,
'But perhaps it would be safer if to b we added z.'

'A brilliant stroke!', said Hall, and added z to either side;
Then looked at his accomplice with a flush of happy pride.
And Knight, he winked at Hall (a very pardonable lapse).
And they printed off the Algebra and sold it to the chaps.

.......................
Cat's Funeral
by E.V. Rieu

Bury her deep, down deep,
Safe in the earth's cold keep,
Bury her deep-

No more to watch bird stir;
No more to clean dark fur;
No more to glisten as silk;
No more to revel in milk;
No more to purr.

Bury her deep, down deep;
She is beyond warm sleep.
She will not walk in the night;
She will not wake to the light.
Bury her deep.
....................

Paint Box

"Cobalt and umber and ultramarine,
Ivory black and emerald green-
What shall I paint to give pleasure to you? "
"Paint for me somebody utterly new."
"I have painted you tigers in crimson and white."
"The colors were good and you painted aright."
"I have painted the cook and a camel in blue
And a panther in purple." "You painted them true.

Now mix me a color that nobody knows,
And paint me a country where nobody goes.
And put in it people a little like you,
Watching a unicorn drinking the dew.
....................

SIR SMASHEM UPPE

Good afternoon, Sir Smasham Uppe!
We're having tea: do take a cup!
Sugar and milk? Now let me see-
Two lumps, I think?...Good gracious me!
The silly thing slipped off your knee!
Pray don't apologize, old chap;
A very trivial mishap!
So clumsy of you? How absurd!
My dear Sir Smasham, not a word!
Now do sit down and have another,
And tell us all about your brother-
You know, the one who broke his head.
Is that poor fellow still in bed?-
A chair-allow me, sir!...Great Scott!
That was a nasty smash! Eh, what?
Oh, not at all: the chair was old-
Queen Anne, or so we have been told.
We've got at least a dozen more:
Just leave the pieces on the floor.
I want you admire our view:
Come nearer to the window, do;
And look how beautiful...Tut, tut!
You didn't see that it was shut?
I hope you are not badly cut!
Not hurt? A fortunate escape!
Amazing! Not a single scrape!
And now, if you have finished tea,
I fancy you might like to see
A little thing or two I've got.
That china plate? Yes, worth a lot:
A beauty too...Ah, there it goes!
I trust it didn't hurt your toes?
Your elbow brushed it off the shelf?
Of course: I've done the same myself.
And now, my dear Sir Smasham - Oh,
You surely don't intend to go?
You must be off? Well, come again.
So glad you're fond of porcelain!

....................
Founder editor of The Penguin Classics
( 1944-1964),
Rieu translated the entire works of Homer into modern English

his The Flattered Flying Fish is a children's poetry book,
illustrated by E.H. Shepard,
who illustrated the Winnie The Pooh stories by Milne :

When the Princess Pricilla goes out
There aren't ANY dragons about:
The dragons decide
It is better to hide
While the Princess Pricilla is out
-

"Oh, what's the use of staying up and yawning
And using up the artifcial light?
For anything may happen in the norning.
And nothing ever happens in the night!"
...
Cuckoo calling; a book of verse for youthful people.
Illustrated with black and white drawings by Violet M. Guy
...
A Puffin Quartet Of Poets
Farjeon, Eleanor & Reeves, James & Rieu, E V & Serraillier, Ian




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