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comparing poems Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen and The Soldier by Rupert Brooke
Posted by: breretonr (144.138.104.---)
Date: August 03, 2007 10:57PM

I need help witing an essay comparing poems Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen and The Soldier by Rupert Brooke.

Any help you can give will be really appriciated.


Re: comparing poems Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen and The Soldier by Rupert Brooke
Posted by: LindaD (91.108.44.---)
Date: August 04, 2007 09:54AM

You'll need to check the exact dates of composition but a key to the difference in tone of the poems is that date. Brooke wrote very early in the war when people were optimistic and still expected it to be over soon. Owen near the end of the war when everyone was tired and disillusioned.


Re: comparing poems Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen and The Soldier by Rupert Brooke
Posted by: hockeysticks (76.189.75.---)
Date: August 04, 2007 05:59PM

It's also very important to recall that Rupert Brooke had not faced combat when he wrote The Soldier and in fact died before he ever saw action. Conversely, Wilfred Owen saw the horrors of the war first hand from the trenches and was killed in action.


Re: comparing poems Dulce et Decorum est by Wilfred Owen and The Soldier by Rupert Brooke
Posted by: hpesoj (69.116.247.---)
Date: August 20, 2007 03:37PM

The poems present starkly divergent views of war and what it means to die for one's country. Dulce et Decorum est pro patria mori means, "it is sweet and right to die for your country." Brooke's poem with its images of rich earth, laughter, gentleness, and hearts at peace after the combat death of its subject is the literal realization of that phrase. Owen, on the other hand, with his grim and grisly description of what combat death truly encompasses provides a far different view. In fact, he calls the phrase, dulce et decorum est, a lie, supporting his charge with a first hand account of comrades falling in battle.

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 08/20/2007 03:38PM by hpesoj.




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