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HELP with "When I Was One-and-Twenty"
Posted by: Heather Self (192.168.128.---)
Date: December 05, 2006 01:06PM

I need help deciphering my poem, I have a project and my assinment is "When I Was One-and-Twenty" I have to find 5 literary terms and ask ques. about it...Can anyone help? Please and Thank-You

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 12/05/2006 01:50PM by lg.


Re: HELP
Posted by: Hugh Clary (192.168.128.---)
Date: December 05, 2006 01:32PM

When I was one-and-twenty
I heard a wise man say,
"Give crowns and pounds and guineas
But not your heart away;
Give pearls away and rubies
But keep your fancy free."
But I was one-and-twenty,
No use to talk to me.

When I was one-and-twenty
I heard him say again,
"The heart out of the bosom
Was never given in vain;

'Tis paid with sighs a-plenty
And sold for endless rue."
And I am two-and-twenty,
And oh, 'tis true, 'tis true.


Only five?

paradox
meter & rhythm (scansion)
rhyme
alliteration & assonance & consonance
trimeter
iambs & anapests (ictus)
feminine & masculine endings
thesis & antithesis & synthesis
enjambment and/or end-stopped lines
humo(u)or

[www.poeticbyway.com]


Re: HELP
Posted by: Heather Self (192.168.128.---)
Date: December 05, 2006 01:44PM

Thank-You so much I appricate ypur help...


Re: HELP with "When I Was One-and-Twenty"
Posted by: MoonBabe (192.168.128.---)
Date: December 09, 2006 03:55PM

Heather---

One very easy thing to discuss and ask questions about
(I'm assuming this is a situation where students teach the class for a day) would be the slant rhymes in the poem.

guineas / rubies

again / vain

This might be very easy then to elaborate on in a discussion of exactly what slant rhymes are, etc. and how they can be effective in poems.

Best wishes!!

Lisa


Re: HELP with "When I Was One-and-Twenty"
Posted by: Hugh Clary (192.168.128.---)
Date: December 10, 2006 01:53PM

In British English, vain really does rhyme with again. It's only the left-pondians who rhyme it with 'men'. I am not sure about the other example, either. Rhyme scheme could be xbxb etc, that is, where the two-syllable odd-numbered lines are not intended to rhyme.


Re: HELP with "When I Was One-and-Twenty"
Posted by: MoonBabe (192.168.128.---)
Date: December 10, 2006 02:33PM

Hugh---LOL---

but I prefer the term "yankee" as in rhyming with "Spankie"

or is it "Spanky" ?

All best wishes to thee . . . or is it thou?

Lisa-Lou (pronounced LOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO not LAU)


Re: HELP with "When I Was One-and-Twenty"
Posted by: IanB (192.168.128.---)
Date: December 11, 2006 05:00AM

In British English, vain really does rhyme with again. It's only the left-pondians who rhyme it with 'men'.

Not always so, Hugh. 'Again' can be pronounced either way in England. Consider the following extracts from Tennyson's poem 'The Revenge. A Ballad of the Fleet', which contain the three occurrences of 'again' in that poem. I have highlighted the rhymes.



Then spake Sir Richard Grenville: "I know you are no coward;
You fly them for a moment to fight with them again.
But Ive ninety men and more that are lying sick ashore. <br /> I should count myself the coward if I left them, my Lord Howard, <br /> To these Inquisition dogs and the devildoms of <b>Spain</b>."<br /> <br /> * * * *<br /> <br /> And Sir Richard said <b>again</b>: <br /> "We be all good English<b>men</b>. <br /> Let us bang these dogs of Seville, the children of the devil, <br /> For I never turnd my back upon Don or devil yet."

* * * *

But Sir Richard cried in his English pride:
"We have fought such a fight for a day and a night
As may never be fought again!
We have won great glory, my men!
And a day less or more
At sea or ashore,
We die - does it matter when?


In such a marvellous poem, in which the variations of metre and rhythm evoke the changing conditions of the sea, we can forgive Tennyson the small technical blemish of including both pronunciations of 'again'.


Re: HELP with "When I Was One-and-Twenty"
Posted by: Hugh Clary (192.168.128.---)
Date: December 11, 2006 11:51AM

Thanks, Ian. Oddly, I was reading Yeats's Under Ben Bulben this morning, and I noticed he also rhymed it with 'men'. There were lots of other slant rhymes in that piece, so I did not notice the double possibility right away. Which thought brings us back to Lisa's point - to me, slant rhyme is used both to add a 'haunting' effect to a poem, and (in UBB's case) to keep the rhyming couplets from getting old quite so quickly.

[www.askoxford.com] />
Still, I feel sure Sherlock Holmes would never pronounce it any way but 'agane'.


Re: HELP with "When I Was One-and-Twenty"
Posted by: JohnnySansCulo (192.168.128.---)
Date: December 11, 2006 11:54AM

A pen in the arse is worth two...mmmm better not go there




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