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What does this poem mean; A peck of gold
Posted by: Kevin Caldwell (---.rasserver.net)
Date: January 28, 2004 05:35PM

Can anyone tell me what this this peom means what is its synbol??


Re: What does this poem mean; A peck of gold
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-03rh16rt-04rh15rt.co.dial-access.att.ne)
Date: January 28, 2004 05:56PM

Robert Frost - A Peck of Gold

Dust always blowing about the town,
Except when sea-fog laid it down,
And I was one of the children told
Some of the blowing dust was gold.

All the dust the wind blew high
Appeared like god in the sunset sky,
But I was one of the children told
Some of the dust was really gold.

Such was life in the Golden Gate:
Gold dusted all we drank and ate,
And I was one of the children told,
'We all must eat our peck of gold.'


Gold's symbol is Ag.


Re: What does this poem mean; A peck of gold
Posted by: Linda (---.cache.pol.co.uk)
Date: January 28, 2004 06:21PM

A peck is a measure of dry goods equal to two gallons. (a bucketful, in other words)

There is an old saying "we all eat a peck of dirt before we die." Now they're saying its the lack of dirt that's causing allergies.


Re: What does this poem mean; A peck of gold
Posted by: IanB (---.tnt11.mel1.da.uu.net)
Date: January 29, 2004 09:01AM

I posted a reply in the similar thread you started in General Discussion. Should have looked here first.


Re: What does this poem mean; A peck of gold
Posted by: Hugh Clary (12.73.175.---)
Date: January 29, 2004 02:10PM


Dust always blowing about the town,

I say, old man, you are missing a verb there.

Frost is almost never saying what he appears to be saying. I notice that this poem once was titled The Common Fate, perhaps from this one:


THE RAINY DAY

The day is cold, and dark, and dreary
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
The vine still clings to the mouldering wall,
But at every gust the dead leaves fall,
And the day is dark and dreary.

My life is cold, and dark, and dreary;
It rains, and the wind is never weary;
My thoughts still cling to the mouldering Past,
But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast,
And the days are dark and dreary.

Be still, sad heart! and cease repining;
Behind the clouds is the sun still shining;
Thy fate is the common fate of all,
Into each life some rain must fall,
Some days must be dark and dreary.
-- Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


Re: What does this poem mean; A peck of gold
Posted by: -Les- (---.trlck.ca.charter.com)
Date: January 29, 2004 02:21PM

Author: IanB (---.tnt11.mel1.da.uu.net)
Date: 01-29-04 07:36

A Peck of Gold
by Robert Lee Frost

Dust always blowing about the town,
Except when sea-fog laid it down,
And I was one of the children told
Some of the blowing dust was gold.

All the dust the wind blew high
Appeared like god in the sunset sky,
But I was one of the children told
Some of the dust was really gold.

Such was life in the Golden Gate:
Gold dusted all we drank and ate,
And I was one of the children told,
'We all must eat our peck of gold.'

In the English imperial system of measurements, a 'peck' (as celebrated in the tongue twister 'Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper') is a two gallon volume of any dry substance. Seems a lot of dust to eat!

Surely there's no one 'central symbol' in this poem. There are two: dust and gold, which can be taken as symbolising the polarities of poverty and wealth, reality and romance, or fact and fancy.

Though poor children may have to live in the dust, and eat dirt as it were, when they have no other standards to go by, they are ready and willing to romanticise their circumstances and to believe grown-ups' assurances that they are rich.

I doubt that this is meant to condemn the comforting lies that innocent children get told. Rather, I read it as a poem of nostalgia for the 'golden age' of childhood.


Re: What does this poem mean; Fall, Leaves, Fall
Posted by: i need help (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date: February 21, 2004 04:26PM

i need to know what the poem Fall, Leaves, Fall by Emily Bronte means for school....could you please help?


Re: What does this poem mean; Fall, Leaves, Fall
Posted by: i need help (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date: February 21, 2004 04:26PM

i need to know what the poem Fall, Leaves, Fall by Emily Bronte means for school....could you please help?

Fall, Leaves, Fall
Emily Bronte

Fall, leaves, fall; die, flowers, away;
Lengthen night and shorten day;
Every leaf speaks bliss to me,
Fluttering from the autumn tree.
I shall smile when wreaths of snow
Blossom where the rose should grow;
I shall sing when night's decay
Ushers in a drearier day.


Re: What does this poem mean; A peck of gold
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-01rh15-16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: February 22, 2004 01:39PM

I shall smile when wreaths of snow
Blossom where the rose should grow;

She is happy about the coming of winter. Could be she likes winter best. Could be she likes the fact that there ARE four seasons. Could be she was a manic depressive. Could be something good will happen when winter arrives: the return of a lover or child, whatever.

What do you think?




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