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Anne Bradstreet: To My Dear and Loving Husband
Posted by: maile (134.69.146.---)
Date: October 03, 2002 06:20PM

Any information regarding Anne Bradstreet's poem To My Dear and Loving Husband would be great! I'm looking for interperetations, insights into the form and style, rhyme, etc. Thank you!


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Re: Anne Bradstreet: To My Dear and Loving Husband
Posted by: maile (134.69.146.---)
Date: October 03, 2002 06:22PM

Also, websites or links with info would be nice! Thanks!


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Re: Anne Bradstreet: To My Dear and Loving Husband
Posted by: Desi (195.7.32.---)
Date: October 04, 2002 06:28AM

1 If ever two were one, then surely we.
2 If ever man were lov'd by wife, then thee.
3 If ever wife was happy in a man,
4 Compare with me, ye women, if you can.
5 I prize thy love more than whole Mines of gold
6 Or all the riches that the East doth hold.
7 My love is such that Rivers cannot quench,
8 Nor ought but love from thee give recompetence.
9 Thy love is such I can no way repay.
10 The heavens reward thee manifold, I pray.
11 Then while we live, in love let's so persever
12 That when we live no more, we may live ever.

The rhymescheme is pretty straightforward: aa, bb, cc, dd, ee, ff
Although the last rhyme don't really rhyme 100% as far as I know (I'm not a native speaker, so maybe someone can confirm or deny this?); you put the stress on different places. Why did she do that in the last sentence? I think so that it really catches your attention.

Apart from the rhymescheme it looks a bit like an english sonnet. It has twelve lines and it has a sort of turn in the last two lines. (an english sonnet's rhyme scheme is usually: ABAB CDCD EFEF GG)


You can find websites on the poem by going to www.google.com and type in the poem, author and for example form, or interpretation.


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Re: Anne Bradstreet: To My Dear and Loving Husband
Posted by: Pam Adams (134.71.18.---)
Date: October 04, 2002 01:37PM

Certainly we would say perseVEER in modern English, but I'm not sure about pronunciation in colonial times. My thought is since she dropped the trailing 'e', that she meant for the pronunciation to rhyme with 'ever' in order to keep the rhymed couplets going.

pam


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Re: Anne Bradstreet: To My Dear and Loving Husband
Posted by: Hugh Clary (12.91.174.---)
Date: October 04, 2002 02:04PM


Looks like it was once pronounced to rhyme with ever:

[www.global-language.com] />

I lost the online Oxford access, but this one is interesting as well. Just choose the JPEG page view, rather than install a separate viewer.


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Re: Anne Bradstreet: To My Dear and Loving Husband
Posted by: Pam Adams (134.71.18.---)
Date: October 04, 2002 02:56PM

Thanks for the link-- a lovely way to waste time.

pam


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