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Non-American poetrs
Posted by: peternsz (---.client.comcast.net)
Date: August 25, 2004 02:48AM

I am looking for a list of five non-American Twentieth Century English Language poets to start me out beyond my present narrow focus on American English Language poets.

Thanks to you all.

Peter


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: marian2 (---.range81-152.btcentralplus.com)
Date: August 25, 2004 04:02AM

Try John Betjeman (UK), Charles Causley (UK), Bruce Dawe (Australia), & Roy Campbell (S Afrcia?) and U A Fanthorpe (UK - female) for starters


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: peternsz (---.client.comcast.net)
Date: August 25, 2004 04:12AM

Thanks, marian2, I'll make a trip to the library and bookstore tomorrow.

Peter


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: Henry (212.219.243.---)
Date: August 25, 2004 09:33AM

Can I add A Shropshire Lad by A E Housman. It's beautifully written in simple language and very easy to read, a great surprise considering that he was an earnest Professor of Latin at Cambridge.

It's said that every subaltern in the First World War kept a copy in his pocket. It's just as relevant today as it was a hundred years ago. You can actually buy a Dover edition for 3 or 4 dollars, an absolute bargain!

Kipling is another suggestion; he also expresses the view of the ordinary person/soldier.


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: lg (---.trlck.ca.charter.com)
Date: August 25, 2004 12:44PM

Banjo Patterson is a favorite from Australia. The University of Toronto has compiled a website for Canadian poets here:

[www.library.utoronto.ca] />

Les



Post Edited (08-25-04 13:44)


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: Chesil (---.clvdoh.adelphia.)
Date: August 25, 2004 05:02PM

As well as those already listed, how about Yeats, Ted Hughes, Larkin, John Masefield and Derek Walcott?


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: rikki (---.carlnfd1.nsw.optusnet.com.au)
Date: August 25, 2004 07:28PM

If you are interested in Australian poets I would also recommend Judith Wright, J. P. McAuley, Kenneth Slessor and A.D.Hope.

[www.infoplease.com] />
rikki


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: StephenFryer (---.l6.c1.dsl.pol.co.uk)
Date: August 26, 2004 03:04AM

Larkin certainly, and Ted Hughes and maybe Thom Gunn.
Personally, I often end up reading A S J Tessimond though there's nothing in print currently.
(You can always read my stuff on the USP forum. It's crap, though. But at least I'm English.)

Stephen


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: peternsz (---.client.comcast.net)
Date: August 26, 2004 03:57AM

SphenFryer,

I do not know what the USP forum is, but you could educate me so I can see your stuff. I missed Gunn the last time he was scheduled to give a reading in Washington Square, San Francisco. What a loss. I have still to finish his 1993-4 Collected Poems.

There is so much good poetry to read.

Peter


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: StephenFryer (---.l6.c1.dsl.pol.co.uk)
Date: August 26, 2004 05:46AM

Peter - USP is the User Submitted Poetry forum on this site. Here's a link to my stuff:
[www.emule.com] />

Stephen


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: Steven Waling (---.gmnews.co.uk)
Date: August 26, 2004 10:13AM

If you want to try something more adventurous, try:

Lee Harwood
Denise Riley
John Tranter (Aus)
Edwin Morgan
Ken Smith
Veronica Forrest-Thompson


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: IanB (---.tnt11.mel1.da.uu.net)
Date: August 28, 2004 03:21AM

Peter, in case you have been Googling unsuccessfully for that Australian favourite mentioned by Les, his surname is spelled Paterson (with one t). A good link is:
[home.vicnet.net.au]
Paterson was such a master exponent of popular balladry in many different forms that he made it look easy.

A very different Australian poet, who just might appeal to you, is Francis Webb. He isn't everyone's cup of tea. He spent his adult life in an out of psychiatric hospitals. Many of his poems are difficult and obscure; but he was an original and brilliant wordsmith, and his poet contemporaries had no doubt about his genius.
Webb's collected work was published in paperback by Angus & Robertson in 1991 as 'Cap And Bells'.


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: peternsz (---.client.comcast.net)
Date: August 28, 2004 03:41AM

I'm working on poets and titles in libraries and bookstores. Found some. I see what you mean about the utter dominance of world culture by things American. Before I forget, much thanks and warm feeling to each person who has taken the time to respond to my enquiry.

Peter


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: September 01, 2004 06:10PM

The Australian poet LES MURRAY is highly praised (I haven't read him).

His anthology is called "Learning Human: Selected Poems"

(good title!)


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: September 01, 2004 06:14PM

"Best New Zealand poets" for the past three years (chosen by editors appointed by the International Institute of Modern Letters), are listed here:

[www.vuw.ac.nz]


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: peternsz (---.client.comcast.net)
Date: September 01, 2004 06:33PM

Thanks, I'll add you suggestions to the list I'm working on from the oher repondents. It certainly is a pleaure to have people to help on a task like this. Some years ago, I decided to get away from dead white male poets to teach a class on women poets, and I had to depend upon only my own devices. It was a pleasent chore, but a chore -- given time restraints -- nonotheless.

Thanks, again,

Peter


Re: Non-American poetrs
Posted by: StephenFryer (---.l4a.c1.dsl.pol.co.uk)
Date: September 08, 2004 06:20PM

Peter, go here -
[www.thepoem.co.uk] />

Stephen




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