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new book-published poet
Posted by: DaveR (---.eurotel.cz)
Date: February 19, 2004 07:52AM

Hi Everyone:

I'm new here, a young new controversial published poet. My book of poetry is Poems From My Bleeding Heart. It's beginning to get great critical review in print. Check out the link:

[www.amazon.com] />

And please if you do read it, I beg you to let me know what you think of it after. Feedback is a real personal thrill, and also helpful to my continuing evolution. In additional, I'm eager to give something back and help any of you with any info or advice you may need about developing as a poet yourself or entering the poetry market with your own efforts. As poets and poetry-lovers, we're all brothers (and sisters) here.

David Rehak

DaveR


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.phoenix-01rh15-16rt.az.dial-access.att.net)
Date: February 19, 2004 12:50PM

I dunno, 20 bucks for a pig in a poke, innit. Gimme a sample, though, and I will think about it.


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: Talia (---.dialsprint.net)
Date: February 19, 2004 02:38PM

Have you got any links to press releases or reviews?


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: February 19, 2004 03:50PM


Quite aside from the fact that this is an ad --

Is it just me, or does a red flag go up when someone refers to HIMSELF as "young" and "controversial"?


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: Pam Adams (---.bus.csupomona.edu)
Date: February 19, 2004 03:54PM

Marian-NYC wrote:

Is it just me, or does a red flag go up when someone refers to
HIMSELF as "young" and "controversial"?

Yeah, it's like claiming that you're writing the great American novel.

pam


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: glenda (---.client.comcast.net)
Date: February 19, 2004 05:06PM

My red flag went up with the title. Better than ears, I suppose.


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-02rh15-16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: February 19, 2004 06:31PM

I saw that his publisher is Publish America.

[tinyurl.com]


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: -Les- (---.trlck.ca.charter.com)
Date: February 19, 2004 06:35PM

Thanks for the info Hugh, very informative.

Les


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: February 20, 2004 01:33PM


From my experience at a couple of university presses, I can tell you that "publishing on demand" is not entirely a bad thing. There are a lot of wonderful books -- not just poetry and fiction, but also scholarship -- cannot sell enough copies to pay for "real" publishing, so e-publishing and "on demand" publishing are being investigated as alternatives to heavily subsidized publishing.

I'm not weighing in on "Publish America" -- I don't have enough info.

I'm just saying: Publishing is CHANGING, and it has to change to accommodate the material being written and the audience that is developing for it. We don't want publishing limited to mass production of sure-fire best-sellers, because we'll end up with Big Brother deciding what's on the shelves at the bookstore. So we should watch these experiments and see how they affect the "little" writer and the "liittle" reader.


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: Pam Adams (---.bus.csupomona.edu)
Date: February 20, 2004 03:20PM

The problem of course is in getting the demand- especially for newer work.

There was a related article in the LA Times today about Netflix, where people subscribe to a DVD rental service. They've been able to get films on DVD that otherwise wouldn't have been put on, because their subscriber base allows them to carry more obscure/less popular work.

pam


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: DaveR (---.eurotel.cz)
Date: February 29, 2004 08:58AM

Hi again everyone...

My apologies for the delayed response. Times are tough right now and my teaching takes up much of my time. You all have very interesting questions and comments. Regarding the book itself, I hope a sample of one of the poems will give you some idea of some of my style and content. But there are different sensibilities and sensitivities out there and I dont want to startle anyone, so read at your own risk. And please be kind haha.

warm regards,


David Rehak
author of "Poems From My Bleeding Heart"




The Recherché Eroticism Of Great Writers & Artists


Marcel Proust saw a man get whipped at a gay brothel
and the image haunted him until the
day his invalid legs were placed inside a coffin.

Toulouse-Lautrec got electric nibbling shivers up his
back at the Moulin Rouge every time he
watched the women dancing together, all four
waltzing feet of each pair
completely in tune with the rhythm of the song,
their breasts pressed snugly against one another,
their eyes in each other's eyes.

Algernon Swinburne was spending a little too much time
with his pet monkey, so a jealous servant killed
and roasted it on a stick. Mmm, good eatin'!

Egon Schiele painted young girls--too young. They
threw him into pedophile prison and denied him his
two necessities--sex and paint brush.

Lord Byron invited the Shelleys and Doctor Polidori to
his grand and exquisite Villa Diodati, where they
indulged in orgies, horror stories, drugs and drink.

Gustave Klimt asked his models to masturbate for his
drawings, and today these low prostitutes are high
art, immortalized in great museums.

Edgar Allan Poe, at his graveyard visits to his dead
wife, Virginia, would weep and kiss and embrace
her in that sepulcher by the sea.

Patricia Miller put her British cunt on paper in
various self-portrait studies. No shy and stiff upper
labia here, no siree!

Sappho and her female admirers read poetry to each
other after making love under the Sun's
burning gaze. What voyeurism is permitted light's
rays!

Picasso liked fat women to lick his ass-o.

Anais Nin fucked her father and brother and then
proclaimed: "I will practice the most incestuous
crimes with a sacred religious sacramental fervor . . .

I will swallow God and sperm."


Re: new book-published poet
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-03rh16rt-04rh15rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: February 29, 2004 12:33PM

Have to pass, thanks anyway. I don't find the language offensive, although some might, but I had several other problems with the sample.

The line breaks seem pretty much randomly chosen, for example,

Marcel Proust saw a man get whipped at a gay brothel
and the image haunted him until the
day his invalid legs were placed inside a coffin.

I cannot imagine what would prompt an author to break after 'the' here. It adds nothing to the meaning, suspense, or direction of the thought.

I would also fault the rhythm, as being entirely 'prosey', with no thought given to how it sounds when being read aloud. There is a definite lack of metaphor and/or other literary devices, and the references themselves pretty much forgettable. Merely rhyming gaze and rays does not a poem make!

Sorry I can't be more positive, but you asked for feedback, and I am being frank with mine.




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