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Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.phoenix-01rh15rt-az.dial-access.att.net)
Date: October 08, 2003 05:44PM


You have access to the OED, right? Can you do me a favor and look up "marrowsky"? Supposed to be like a spoonerism, but perhaps an earlier invention/person. The pronunciation, if available, and if only the first letters of one word and the next are transposed (such as Cugh Hlary), or if it can have other transpositions (such as clue hairy or Cinderella and her sisty uglers).

Much obliged.


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Linda (---.cache.pol.co.uk)
Date: October 08, 2003 07:10PM

Marrowsky. (mărαu•ski) 1863. [f. proper name.] A deformed language in which the initial consonants of contiguous words are transposed.

Sorry I'm not Chesil, but I suppose anybody's OED will do. I may not have found quite the correct characters for the phonetics but it does look like the dictionary.

Why do you want it anyway?


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Tigermonkey (---.in-addr.btopenworld.com)
Date: October 08, 2003 07:30PM

I'm not Chesil either, but here's my tuppence-worth:

Chambers': A spoonerism. v.i. to utter a spoonerism. [Said to be from the name of a Polish count.]


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: October 09, 2003 12:05PM

I found a site that quotes FROM the OED:


marrowsky - 1863, from a proper name. "A deformed language in which the initial consonants of contiguous words are transposed." [O.E.D.]


So it seems that the word "marrowsky" is not itself a marrowsky word.


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.phoenix-01rh15rt-az.dial-access.att.net)
Date: October 09, 2003 12:47PM


Why do you want it anyway?

Well, I had a little self-referencing ditty in mind when I thought it might be MAR-oh-ski. Back to the drawing board now.


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.phoenix-01rh15rt-az.dial-access.att.net)
Date: October 09, 2003 02:03PM


Chambers': A spoonerism. v.i. to utter a spoonerism. [Said to be from the name of a Polish count.]

What's Chambers? A dictionary? Or does 'to chambers' mean to utter a sponerism? The good Rev. Spooner wuddunt a Polish count, in any case.


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Linda (---.cache.pol.co.uk)
Date: October 09, 2003 02:47PM

Chambers The dictionary for crossworders in Britain, its range is slightly different from OED.


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Chesil (---.client.attbi.com)
Date: October 12, 2003 02:35PM

Sorry, I have been travelling the last few weeks with limited access.

Marrowsky


a. A variety of slang, or a slip in speaking, characterized by transposition of initial letters, syllables, or parts of two words. Also marrowsky language.
1863 R. Nicholson Autobiogr. Fast Man xviii. 200 Fanny King, or as Bill Leach, in the interesting language called Marouski, termed her, Kanny Fing. 1883 G. A. Sala Living London 491 The vocabulary of Tim Bobbin, Josh Billings,+and the ‘Marowsky’ language.

b. An instance of this.
1923 in N. & Q. 27 Oct. 331/2 In my childhood+an old cousin used to entertain me with what we now call spoonerisms, but which she termed morowskis. 1962 V. Nabokov Pale Fire 185, I remember one perfect evening when my friend sparkled with quips, and marrowskies, and anecdotes.

Hence ma"rrowskyer, one who uses marrowsky language or makes marrowskies in his speech; ma"rrowskying vbl. n., the intentional or accidental transposition of initial letters, etc.
1860 Hotten Dict. Slang (ed. 2) 173 s.v. Medical Greek. At the London University they have a way of disguising English+which consists in transposing the initials of words.+ This disagreeable nonsense is often termed marrowskying. 1912 Brit. Med. Jrnl. 22 June 1443 It would be interesting if ‘marrowskyers'’ blunders could also be classified. Ibid., All actors live in dread of ‘marrowskying’, that curious transposition of syllables. 1922 O. Jespersen Lang. viii. 150 ‘Marrowskying’ or ‘Hospital Greek’ transfers the initial letters of words, as renty of plain.


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-04rh16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: October 12, 2003 07:03PM


So Spooner (1844-1930), only 16 years old in 1860, nicked it from Marrowsky - cool, thanks!


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Pam Adams (134.71.192.---)
Date: October 13, 2003 01:41PM

Hmmm. I can set Google for Klingon, Bork bork bork, Pig Latin, and the ever-popular Elmer Fudd. No Marrowsky, though.

pam


Re: Ahoy, Chesil!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-01rh16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: October 13, 2003 04:15PM


Looks like Marrowsky's real name was 'something' else, but just what is still unclear. Seems a good topic for a college theses, if one could spend a few days at the Library of Congress.

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