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I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Ramya (202.88.178.---)
Date: September 17, 2003 04:03AM

hi

Re the last line of Neruda's poem - "like a puma in the barrens of Quitratue" - can someone pls tell me what "Quitratue" means?

Thank you.

Ramya


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: marian2 (---.in-addr.btopenworld.com)
Date: September 17, 2003 04:17AM

From the cntext, it's a place - like saying the skyscrapers of New York.


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Pam Adams (---.bus.csupomona.edu)
Date: September 17, 2003 01:32PM

Now I'm picturing a puma in a skyscraper.

pam


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Ramya (202.88.133.---)
Date: September 17, 2003 01:39PM

i was thinking of a puma in a desert .

Ramya


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: marian2 (---.in-addr.btopenworld.com)
Date: September 17, 2003 02:10PM

Sounds about right - barrens - where nothing grows = deserts. If you google Quitratue, you get quite a few things other than the Neruda poem, but not in a language I understand. One or two seem likely to mean it's a place in that they are capitalized.


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: -Les- (---.trlck.ca.charter.com)
Date: September 17, 2003 02:26PM

Most likely the city of Quitratue in Chile is the place being referred to by Neruda since he lived there in Chile. Here's a website that mentions this:

[www.virtualtourist.com] />
Les


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Talia (216.117.99.---)
Date: September 17, 2003 06:20PM

When you think of a puma, is it a cat, a shoe, or a snowmobile?


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-02rh15rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: September 17, 2003 06:39PM


I always think of Ogden Nash:

A jolly young fellow from Yuma
Told an elephant joke to a puma;
Now his skeleton lies
Beneath hot western skies -
The puma had no sense of huma.


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: September 17, 2003 06:49PM


I'm finding the same - a place in Chile that goes WAY BACK (archeology there is good) and is still in business.

In Spanish, there's an accent on the e: Quitratué. Kee-tra-too-AY.

This suggests an indigenous place name (not a Spanish one).

In the year 2000 it was getting funding to put in a watertreatment system, so it's not a cutting-edge-modern kind of place.

THE BARRENS ... maybe the desert surrounding it?


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-01rh15rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: September 18, 2003 12:16PM

Tengo hambre de tu boca, de tu voz, de tu pelo,
y por las calles voy sin nutrirme, callado,
no me sostiene el pan, el alba me desquicia,
busco el sonido liquido de tus pies en el dia.

Estoy hambriento de tu sonrisa resbalada,
de tus manos color de furioso granero,
tengo hambre de la palida piedra de tus uñas,
quiero comer tu piel como una intacta almendra.

Quiero comer el rayo quemado en tu hermosura,
la nariz soberana del arrogante rostro,
quiero comer la sombra fugaz de tus pestañas

y hambriento vengo y voy olfateando el crepusculo
buscandote, buscando tu corazón caliente
como un puma en la soledad de Quitratue.


I only know a little Spanish, but I would translate la soledad as solitude instead of barrens.


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Pam Adams (---)
Date: September 18, 2003 01:22PM

'Solitude' is what my Spanish/English dictionary comes up with- perhaps it's a Chilean phrase. I would translate that first line as 'I am hungry for...'

pam


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: September 18, 2003 05:57PM

Yes, "soledad de Quitratue" definitely means "solitude of Quitratue."

Perhaps the translator thought (correctly) that English-language readers wouldn't know what Quitratue is like so they wouldn't have an image of it. They might think of a Puma in a rain forest, and "barrens" is meant to let them know that it's desert terrain. ?


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Pam Adams (---)
Date: September 18, 2003 09:17PM

Or trying to convey something like 'wilds,' which is where any sensible puma would live. A coyote, on the other paw, might opt for downtown, or at least the suburbs.

pam


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: IanB (---.tnt11.mel1.da.uu.net)
Date: September 19, 2003 09:53AM

Surprising how few of the Internet sites giving this poem credit the translator, Stephen Tapscott.

To me, the word 'barrens' is an inspired translation of 'la soledad'. Echoing the pacing of the puma, describing the essential character of the area, and avoiding the pathetic fallacy overtone of 'solitude'. With the addition of the exotic name 'Quitratue' you can just picture the flicking of the big cat's tail.

In Australia we don't refer to our deserts as 'barrens'. I gather the expression doesn't mean a desert in our sense of an exceptionally arid or stony zone, but rather land that is infertile or unfruitful for whatever reason. My dictionary cites 'the famous pine barrens of America'. So I guess the expression could refer even to suburban areas that are environmentally degraded and not worth planting.


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: September 22, 2003 01:21PM


Pine BARRENS ???

I thought it was Pine Barons ... like railroad barons!

Oh, how retroactively embarrassing. Once again, its the non-Yanks who know the most about the U.S.A.


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: glenda (---.client.comcast.net)
Date: September 22, 2003 02:04PM

Isn't there a famous pine barrons in New Jersey? [www.pineypower.com] />


Post Edited (09-22-03 13:05)


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: E.J. Lewis (203.162.4.---)
Date: September 30, 2003 03:18PM

Let down your hair.
Shut up.
Come on over here.
Open your mouth.
Nice teeth!

E.J. Lewis


Re: I crave your mouth, your voice, your hair
Posted by: E.J. Lewis (203.162.4.---)
Date: October 02, 2003 07:01AM

Shut up,take your hair out of your mouth and let's get on with it.

E.J. Lewis




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