General Discussion
 Topics of or related to poetry. 

eMule -> The Poetry Archive -> Forums -> General Discussion


Goto Thread: PreviousNext
Goto: Forum ListMessage ListNew TopicSearchLog In
and if you're feeling really generous...
Posted by: marian2 (---.in-addr.btopenworld.com)
Date: August 29, 2003 08:24AM

From the same site:

www.theotherpages.org/poems/books/ adams/something02.html - 38k

is 'Lines Written on the Sunny Side of Frankfort (sic - ? correct?) Street parodying Milton, if so what Milton poem ?

is Lines Provoked by Hearing a Young Man Whistling a parody as well - if so what is it parodying?


Anyone know what the 'Robin Hood' reference is in 'after hearing 'Robin Hood' - with a name like mine that is significant?


I'll try and work out all the sources of 'Lines on and from Bartlett's Familiar Quotations' myself - I assume the book is/was the US equivalent of the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations ie a standard much used reference book, but if anyone wants to help, I'd be delighted.

PS I'm not asking for help with homework assignments, I'm just a parody freak with a yen to compare the parody with the source and also have some idea of other influences (eg the ? prohibition in the Maud Muller parody), cos I enjoy them more that way.


Re: and if you're feeling really generous...
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.MCLNVA23.covad.net)
Date: August 29, 2003 10:59AM


Robin Hood: [www.hrc.utexas.edu] />
Frankfort - I did not see the poem on that page (delete the space before adams to get to the link). Whistling, dunno, but from the intro"LINES PROVOKED BY HEARING A YOUNG MAN WHISTLING" I would think it is simply one of his pet peeves.


Re: and if you're feeling really generous...
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: August 29, 2003 01:21PM

Another source for the same info about Harry Smith's ROBIN HOOD:

[www.lib.utexas.edu] />
I guess he (Adams) loved the music and hated the script.


an aside ... re parody
Posted by: ilza (---.162.226.12.sao.ajato.com.br)
Date: August 29, 2003 06:26PM

...
my beloved Sam Hoffenstein also wrote parodies
(Greek paroidía, “a song sung alongside another”)
( Encyclopædia Britannica mentions his name as one of the best)

here is one ( the only one I know by heart, or think I do ... ,
not a good example, but ... )

Edna St. Vincent Millay

I burn my candle at both ends,
It will not last the night
But oh my foes and oh my friends,
It makes a lovely light.

Samuel Hoffenstein ( who was actually a good friend of her ! )

I burned my candle at both ends,
And now I have neither foes nor friends;
For all the lovely light begotten,
I’m paying now in feeling rotten.


Re: and if you're feeling really generous...
Posted by: marian2 (---.in-addr.btopenworld.com)
Date: August 31, 2003 09:28AM

Thanks for the information about Robin Hood, and the lovely parody from Ilza - I've always liked that Edna SVM poem, so the parody is the icing on the cake.

I've been confusing Hugh again - sorry - the Frankfort St poem is on either the next page to the link I gave, I browsed on from that - it appealed to my perverse sense of humour - I'll post it below:

Lines Written on the Sunny Side of Frankfort Street - Franklyn P Adams

SPORTING with Amaryllis in the shade,
(I credit Milton in parenthesis),
Among the speculations that she made
Was this:

"When"--these her very words--"when you return,
A slave to duty's harsh commanding call,
Will you, I wonder, ever sigh and yearn
At all?"

Doubt, honest doubt, sat then upon my brow.
(Emotion is a thing I do not plan).
I could not fairly answer then, but now
I can.

Yes, Amaryllis, I can tell you this,
Can answer publicly and unafraid:
You haven't any notion how I miss
The shade.


Re: and if you're feeling really generous...
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: September 02, 2003 03:30PM

Completely off topic, but "Amaryllis" reminded me of this:


In STARDUST MEMORIES, Woody Allen plays a film-maker mightly like Woody Allen. At a Q & A session during a film festival, someone says, "You're often accused of being narcissistic."

He replies, "I can assure you, if I were to identify with a figure from Greek mythology, it would NOT be Narcissus."

Someone calls out: "Who would it be."

Woody answers: "Zeus."


(Transcribed from memory - probably NOT verbatim.)




Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
This poetry forum at emule.com powered by Phorum.