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analysis Marvell's poem
Posted by: Licia (---.lisp.com.au)
Date: March 05, 2003 11:10PM

A dialogue between the soul and body


Re: analysis Marvell's poem
Posted by: Les (---.trlck.ca.charter.com)
Date: March 06, 2003 12:05AM

A Dialogue Between The Soul And Body
by Andrew Marvell

Soul
O Who shall, from this Dungeon, raise
A Soul inslav'd so many wayes?
With bolts of Bones, that fetter'd stands
In Feet ; and manacled in Hands.
Here blinded with an Eye ; and there
Deaf with the drumming of an Ear.
A Soul hung up, as 'twere, in Chains
Of Nerves, and Arteries, and Veins.
Tortur'd, besides each other part,1
In a vain Head, and double Heart.

Body
O who shall me deliver whole,
From bonds of this Tyrannic Soul?
Which, stretcht upright, impales me so,
That mine own Precipice I go;
And warms and moves this needless Frame:
(A Fever could but do the same.)
And, wanting where its spight to try,
Has made me live to let me dye.
A Body that could never rest,
Since this ill Spirit it possest.

Soul
What Magic could me thus confine
Within anothers Grief to pine?
Where whatsoever it complain,
I feel, that cannot feel, the pain.
And all my Care its self employes,
That to preserve, which me destroys:
Constrain'd not only to indure
Diseases, but, whats worse, the Cure:
And ready oft the Port to gain,
Am Shipwrackt into Health again.

Body
But Physick yet could never reach
The Maladies Thou me dost teach;
Whom first the Cramp of Hope does Tear:
And then the Palsie Shakes of Fear.
The Pestilence of Love does heat :
Or Hatred's hidden Ulcer eat.
Joy's chearful Madness does perplex:
Or Sorrow's other Madness vex.
Which Knowledge forces me to know;
And Memory will not foregoe.
What but a Soul could have the wit
To build me up for Sin so fit?
So Architects do square and hew,
Green Trees that in the Forest grew.



Here it is Licia, what now?


Re: analysis Marvell's poem
Posted by: Pam Adams (---)
Date: March 06, 2003 03:58PM

Essentially, the soul says 'This clumsy body is holding me back!' and the body says 'The soul is picking on me!' Eventually, they learn to work together.

pam


Re: analysis Marvell's poem
Posted by: Jac (---.156ce.maxonline.com.sg)
Date: November 20, 2004 02:16AM

its saying that the body and soul cannot be divorced


Re: analysis Marvell's poem
Posted by: RJAllen (---.creation-net.co.uk)
Date: November 20, 2004 02:41PM

It would be interesting to compare with Housman's The Immortal Part which is a kind of parody of it.


Re: analysis Marvell's poem
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-02rh15-16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: November 21, 2004 12:25PM

When I meet the morning beam,
Or lay me down at night to dream,
I hear my bones within me say,
'Another night, another day.

'When shall this slough of sense be cast,
This dust of thoughts be laid at last,
The man of flesh and soul be slain
And the man of bone remain?

'This tongue that talks, these lungs that shout
These thews that hustle us about,
This brain that fills the skull with schemes,
And its humming hive of dreams,---

'These to-day are proud in power
And lord it in their little hour:
The immortal bones obey control
Of dying flesh and dying soul.

''Tis long till eve and morn are gone:
Slow the endless night comes on,
And late to fulness grows the birth
That shall last as long as earth.

'Wanderers eastward, wanderers west,
Know you why you cannot rest?
'Tis that every mother's son
Travails with a skeleton.

Lie down in the bed of dust;
Bear the fruit that bear you must;
Bring the eternal seed to light,
And morn is all the same as night.

'Rest you so from trouble sore,
Fear the heat o' the sun no more,
Nor the snowing winter wild,
Now you labour not with child.

'Empty vessel, garment cast,
We that wore you long shall last.
---Another night, another day.'
So my bones within me say.

Therefore they shall do my will
To-day while I am master still,
And flesh and soul, now both are strong,
Shall hale the sullen slaves along,

Before this fire of sense decay,
This smoke of thought blow clean away,
And leave with ancient night alone
The stedfast and enduring bone.


The bone is the immortal part? And Alfred liked many a lightfoot lad? Hmmm ...




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