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Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: hpesoj (69.116.247.---)
Date: June 29, 2008 10:58AM

While reading Margaret Atwood's, Negotiating With The Devil, A Writer on Writing , I came across this description of a poet:

And now in imagination he has climbed
another planet, the better to look
with single camera view upon this earth
its total scope, and each afflated tick,
its talk, its trick, its tracklesness - and this,
this he would like to write down in a book.


---A. M. Klein Portrait of the Poet as Landscape

I think it a fairly apt description of the mysterious and inexplicable forces that motivate a person to undertake such a daunting task as writing a poem. There are many others, I'm sure, and I hope visitors will use this thread to share some of them.

Joe

Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 06/30/2008 07:42AM by hpesoj.


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: IanAKB (203.217.91.---)
Date: June 29, 2008 08:54PM

Interesting quote, Joe.

I wonder what exactly Klein means by "each afflated tick". Presumably referring to the ticks of a clock, not blood-sucking insects. Inspired moments? It's still an odd description of what an elevated observer might see. As for "afflated", what or who is inspired, and what or who does the inspiring?

There appears to be a typo in the second line. Should it be "planet" or "platea"?

Ian


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: JohnnyBoy (24.189.158.---)
Date: June 29, 2008 09:04PM

Must be "platelet" which makes that blood-afflated tick more understandable


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: IanAKB (203.217.91.---)
Date: June 30, 2008 04:35AM

LOL Johnny. But it's "planet"

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Not sure how one climbs a planet, however the Canadians don't seem to have any concerns about that.

There is much praise of Klein’s poem here

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and here

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but no explanation of the afflated tick

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 06/30/2008 04:52AM by IanAKB.


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: hpesoj (69.116.247.---)
Date: June 30, 2008 08:01AM

Ian:

I corrected the typo...thanks for noticing it. As for the "afflated tick," I view it as metaphor for all inspired creation, from the faintest of ideas to the most brilliant discoveries, since the beginning of time. The impossibility of capturing these, I think, is an appropriate description of the lifelong quixotic quest of a poet.

Joe

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/01/2008 06:44AM by hpesoj.


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: JohnnyBoy (71.249.169.---)
Date: June 30, 2008 08:55AM

I know that Canadians stand on cars, as stated in their national anthem:
"O Canada, we stand on cars for thee"

Didn't know they climbed on planets like The Little Prince

I'd think rather that the poet is immersed within the world, and having experienced something, would then write on it


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: hpesoj (69.116.247.---)
Date: June 30, 2008 09:37AM

Johnny:

Maybe Margaret Atwood will quote you in her next book.

Joe


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: JohnnyBoy (68.194.80.---)
Date: June 30, 2008 10:03AM

Unlikely

Brad Meltzer might, though


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: les712 (68.185.69.---)
Date: June 30, 2008 02:15PM

Some perhaps relevant quotations:

“Verse is not written, it is bled; Out of the poet's abstract head. Words drip the poem on the page; Out of his grief, delight and rage.”

--Paul Engle

“When a poet's mind is perfectly equipped for its work, it is constantly amalgamating disparate experiences.”

--T.S. Eliot

“Next to being a great poet, is the power of understanding one.”

--Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


Les


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: hpesoj (69.116.247.---)
Date: July 03, 2008 06:20AM

Like plumbers and dentists, poets are fallible, and the possibility of genuine nonsense cannot be ruled out. Unlike plumbing and dentistry, however, poetry is slow, frustrating, and poorly rewarded work which fails more often than it succeeds and is therefore embarked upon largely by men and women laboring under a sense of almost religious vocation, grandiose self-delusion, or some combination of both. As a result, many poems...are written by people whose minds you may not wish to enter.

----Mark Haddon The Talking Horse and The Sad Girl and The Village Under the Sea


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: les712 (68.185.69.---)
Date: July 03, 2008 02:53PM

Louis Dudek, the Canadian poet had some great ideas about poetry.



What is it that a poet knows

What is it that a poet knows
that tells him ­­ 'this is real'?
Some revelation, a gift of sight,
granted through an effort of the mind ­­
of infinite delight.

All the time I have been writing on the very edge of knowledge,

heard the real world whispering
with an indistinct and liquid rustling­­
as if to free, at last, an inextricable meaning!
Sought for words simpler, smoother, more clean than any,
only to clear the air
of an unnecessary obstruction…

Not because I wanted to meddle with the unknown
(I do not believe for a moment that it can be done),
but because the visible world seemed to be waiting,
as it always is,
somehow, to be revealed





Les

Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 07/03/2008 02:55PM by les712.


Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: IanAKB (203.217.91.---)
Date: July 12, 2008 05:51PM

all inspired creation, from the faintest of ideas to the most brilliant discoveries, since the beginning of time. The impossibility of capturing these, I think, is an appropriate description of the lifelong quixotic quest of a poet

Nicely put, Joe.


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Date: May 09, 2011 03:01AM

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Re: Portrait of the Poet as Landscape
Posted by: bella10388 (113.22.8.---)
Date: August 22, 2011 03:58AM

Quote:
hpesoj
Ian:

I corrected the typo...thanks for noticing it. As for the "afflated tick," I view it as metaphor for all inspired creation, from the faintest of ideas to the most brilliant discoveries, since the beginning of time. The impossibility of capturing these, I think, is an appropriate description of the lifelong quixotic quest of a poet.

Joe

I also think so.

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