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Help with "London"- Please I'm panicked
Posted by: Peg (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date: October 21, 2000 09:03PM

Please help!!!

An English major I am not!!!!

In "London" he says:

I wander thro'each charter'd street,
Near where the charter'd Thames does flow,

What does "charter'd" mean, and what social change did it imply. Can you site an example from Winstanley or Goldsmith of this change.

Please help - with the meaning and social change.


RE: Help with "London"- Please I'm panic
Posted by: Peter (---.host.btclick.com)
Date: October 23, 2000 03:41AM

Peg
You don't mention (in this request anyway) who the poet is, but charters were legal documents granted by the sovereign (King or Queen) to organisations, allowing them privileges to carry out their business. From Saxon or medieval times onwards, many boroughs and cities had charters of rights and liberties, giving them legal or corporate identity. This identity meant they could own land and hold their own borough courts. The poem quite possibly also alludes to the fact that London was the centre of the guilds and livery companies, which regulated the work and privileges of craftsmen, again from the Middle Ages. By the C19th there were 77 London livery companies including bakers, goldsmiths, musicians etc.
The City of London - the 'square mile' of what is today a huge conglomeration - is still today owned largely by the remnants of those guilds, and the City of London Corporation elects its members based on that idea.
Town and city charters largely disappeared in the lateC19th when local government was completely reorganised, but the guilds live on. Royal Charters are today given to commericial interests - for supplying goods and services to the Crown.
A bit complicated perhaps, but poetry being what it is, it uses symbolic expressions to put across its message. Charters and London are synonymous - perhaps he is trying to say something of the constricted nature of the narrow streets; similarly the River Thames is constricted here by the buildings on either bank?
Hope this helps - if you can tell me the poet, the rest of the poem might offer other clues.
Peter


RE: Help with "London"- Please I'm panic
Posted by: Christine (---.cant.ac.uk)
Date: October 26, 2000 10:36AM

I'm a student at Canterbury Christ Church college and I have to anaylze any poem we have covered. I have chose William Blake's, "London," and I need help with some of the interpretations. I've looked on the net and cannot find much. If you know of any sites that actually discuss the meaning and interpretations of this poem, please let me know. Also, if you have any imput, I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks for your time, Christine

Peter wrote:


Peg
You don't mention (in this request anyway) who the poet is, but
charters were legal documents granted by the sovereign (King or
Queen) to organisations, allowing them privileges to carry out
their business. From Saxon or medieval times onwards, many
boroughs and cities had charters of rights and liberties,
giving them legal or corporate identity. This identity meant
they could own land and hold their own borough courts. The
poem quite possibly also alludes to the fact that London was
the centre of the guilds and livery companies, which regulated
the work and privileges of craftsmen, again from the Middle
Ages. By the C19th there were 77 London livery companies
including bakers, goldsmiths, musicians etc.
The City of London - the 'square mile' of what is today a huge
conglomeration - is still today owned largely by the remnants
of those guilds, and the City of London Corporation elects its
members based on that idea.
Town and city charters largely disappeared in the lateC19th
when local government was completely reorganised, but the
guilds live on. Royal Charters are today given to commericial
interests - for supplying goods and services to the Crown.
A bit complicated perhaps, but poetry being what it is, it uses
symbolic expressions to put across its message. Charters and
London are synonymous - perhaps he is trying to say something
of the constricted nature of the narrow streets; similarly the
River Thames is constricted here by the buildings on either bank?
Hope this helps - if you can tell me the poet, the rest of the
poem might offer other clues.
Peter




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