General Discussion
 General Discussion 

eMule -> The Poetry Archive -> Forums -> General Discussion


Goto Thread: PreviousNext
Goto: Forum ListMessage ListNew TopicSearchLog In
villanelle
Posted by: Pat Hathaway (---.inetarena.com)
Date: October 17, 2000 11:08PM

Does anybody know of a villanelle (or more than one!) as good as Dylan Thomas's "Do Not Go Gentle..." or Theodore Roethke's "The Waking"?

Thanks for suggestions!


RE: villanelle
Posted by: Soma (---.tnt1.hba1.da.uu.net)
Date: October 18, 2000 04:42AM

Pat,
I found two more villanelles in my copy ''The Norton Anthology of Poetry'.

Elizabeth Bishop's "One Art".
William Empson's "Missing Dates".


RE: villanelle
Posted by: Pat Hathaway (---.inetarena.com)
Date: October 18, 2000 09:41AM

Thanks so much. I'll find a Norton's. Actually, I have one, but it's a 'shorter version' which doesn't have this poem by Empson and doesn't have Bishop at all.


RE: villanelle
Posted by: Pat Hathaway (---.inetarena.com)
Date: October 18, 2000 10:22AM

Sorry to post again, but I forgot something. If I remember correctly, the Norton's is a really BIG book, and has no index to types of poems. Do you know this book well enough to know which poems are villanelles?? I tend to find them accidently, by looking at the shape and muttering 'has a few stanzas with three lines, and, yup, a final stanza with four lines...' So, the question is--how'd you find the two you mentioned?


RE: villanelle
Posted by: Soma (---.tnt1.hba1.da.uu.net)
Date: October 18, 2000 12:03PM

Oh, Pat, you have hit on my method! I actually did find them accidently on purpose! hehehe

I got out my BIG Norton, turned up the two poets you mentioned. ie Roethke p1385 and Thomas p1460, assumed some other poets of that era probably wote villanelles, slowly turned over 100 leaves from page 1300 to page 1500, kept my eyes skun, and within two hours found the Empson and Bishop villanelles, which I should have found within the first five minutes.

Why did it take me two hours? Well, as I turned those pages I couldn't resist reading this poem and that one.
Here is just one of them, by the recently-appointed American Poet Laureate, 95 years old Stanley Kunitz:

'He'

He runs before the wise men: he
Is moving on the hills like snow.
No gifts, no tears, no company
He brings, but wind-rise and water-flow.

In meadows of descended day
His motion leans, dividing air:
He takes the unforgiving way
Beneath the apostolic star.

She who has known him calls him stranger.
Parting the night's long hair, he steals
Within the heart, that humble manger
Where the white, astonished spirit kneels.

His vertical inflicting pride,
Whose shadow cuts the nib of space,
Bends to this virtue fructified.
But though he kiss the little face

Like rapture breaking on the mind,
The necessary fierce details
Implacably he has designed.
Redemption hangs upon the nails.


RE: villanelle
Posted by: Pat Hathaway (---.inetarena.com)
Date: October 18, 2000 11:30PM

Searching by era--an excellent suggestion. And I understand why it took too hours--it's taken me that long to look up a word in the dictionary. And thanks for the Kunitz poem. My itty, bitty Norton's doesn't have him, either. Well, what can you expect of a book that shortens Shelley's "Adonais" to a haiku. Nah, really, I have the greatest of admiration for Norton, whoever or whatever he/it is. A publishing company? A real person? Anyhow, I am now even more determined to get the great, big, unshortened version.


RE: villanelle
Posted by: Leiv (193.216.206.---)
Date: October 20, 2000 04:50AM

A Dainty Thing's the Villanelle

A dainty thing's the Villanelle,
Sly, musical, a jewel in rhyme,
It serves its purpose passing well.

A double-clappered silver bell
That must be made to clink in chime,
A dainty thing's the Villanelle;

And if you wish to flute a spell,
Or ask a meeting 'neath the lime,
It serves its purpose passing well.

You must not ask of it the swell
Of organs grandiose and sublime--
A dainty thing's the Villanelle;

And, filled with sweetness, as a shell
Is filled with sound, and launched in time,
It serves its purpose passing well.

Still fair to see and good to smell
As in the quaintness of its prime,
A dainty thing's the Villanelle,
It serves its purpose passing well.

William Ernest Henley


RE: villanelle
Posted by: Pat Hathaway (---.inetarena.com)
Date: October 20, 2000 11:20PM

Thank you. Doubt I would ever have found this one on my own. It's sort of noisy, in a tinkling way.




Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
This poetry forum at emule.com powered by Phorum.