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Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: April 19, 2002 02:09PM


A few weeks ago, someone raised (again) the question: Does anything rhyme with ORANGE?

Someone else recalled the name GORRINGE but couldn't quite place it.

By chance (or fate, or nature's changing course, untrimmed) or because of the query, I found TWO Gorringes in the following days:


PERCY GORRINGE is one of Bertie Wooster's nemeses in P.G. Wodehouse, JEEVES AND THE FEUDAL SPIRIT


HAROLD GORRINGE is the antiques collector in Peter Shaffer's play, BLACK COMEDY.


Rhyme boldly!


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.sdsl.cais.net)
Date: April 19, 2002 02:27PM


Close, but the word was Bloringe, supposedly a mountain somewhere.

Henry Honeychurch Gorringe was from Richard Lederer's Adventures of a Verbivore, mentioned by ilza. Heck, we got three Gorringes now!


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Pam Adams (---.csupomona.edu)
Date: April 19, 2002 05:49PM

and probably all named for the same reason.......

pam


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: ilza (---.162.231.184.sao.ajato.com.br)
Date: April 19, 2002 08:43PM

I have a book by Arthur Guiterman, with the following poem/explanation :

( there was a man named Henry Honeychurch Gorringe.
He was a naval commander who in the midnineteenth century
oversaw the transport of Cleopatra's Needle to New York's Central Park)

In Sparkhill buried lies a man of a mark
Who brought the Obelisk to Central Park,
Redoubtable Commander H. H. Gorringe,
Whose name supplies the long-sought rhyme for orange.


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Marian-NYC (---.nyc1.dsl.speakeasy.net)
Date: April 22, 2002 03:17PM

Does someone want to write "The Love of Three Gorringes"?



(for the non-music-appreciative, that alludes to "The Love of Three Oranges," Prokofiev's op.33)


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: lg (---.ca.charter.com)
Date: January 07, 2005 12:26AM

An interesting side tradk:

[66.102.7.104] />

Les


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: JohnnySansCulo (---.nycmny83.covad.net)
Date: January 07, 2005 09:55AM

I remember hearing a joke about Cole Porter inventing the word "cellophane" so that he would have a rhyme for "fellow thane" for his "Macbeth - The Musical"


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: LRye (---.brmngh01.mi.comcast.net)
Date: January 07, 2005 11:54PM

I love Cole Porter and agree totally;
when all else fails, punt. As a poet you have all the artistic license
you need---coin your own words.

Lisa


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: JohnnySansCulo (---.dyn.optonline.net)
Date: January 09, 2005 04:34PM

so....was the FRUIT named first or the COLOR?


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: LRye (---.brmngh01.mi.comcast.net)
Date: January 10, 2005 12:56AM

that's funny!!


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Linda (---.l1.c1.dsl.pol.co.uk)
Date: January 10, 2005 12:18PM

The fruit is derived from the Arabic neranja, the colour from the fruit. But William of Orange?


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: JohnnySansCulo (---.nycmny83.covad.net)
Date: January 10, 2005 12:21PM

He's no Eric THE Red !


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Veronika (---.213.143.81.63.dc.telemach.net)
Date: January 12, 2005 07:37AM

How about a "half rhyme" or consonance such as: cringe, fringe, singe, etc. Or even wrench.

Regards, V.


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: drpeternsz (---.client.comcast.net)
Date: January 12, 2005 07:49AM

nonce or thwice, at least


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Ebon Lupus (---.or.charter.com)
Date: January 31, 2005 07:41PM

I suppose, if pressed, and I didn't care about the slop, I might use the word arrange or derange or the like. I know, they don't actually rhyme but could pass in a song.


"Forever shall the Wolf in me... desire the sheep in you."


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: JohnnySansCulo (---.dyn.optonline.net)
Date: January 31, 2005 11:49PM

How does everyone pronounce orange?

My new york way is R-inge

People from Florida saw Aww-ringe
but then again, they also say Flaw-rida



Post Edited (01-31-05 22:49)


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-03rh16rt-04rh15rt.co.dial-access.att.ne)
Date: February 01, 2005 12:04PM

Ornge, obviously. I suppose you also have a mispronunciation of portry?


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: JohnnySansCulo (---.nycmny83.covad.net)
Date: February 01, 2005 12:46PM

poa -tree


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: jc (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date: February 14, 2005 05:50PM

is there a word that rhymes with ornge?


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (12.73.175.---)
Date: February 14, 2005 06:42PM

While peeling an ornge
I made a forlorn g-
esture.


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Kacey (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date: March 30, 2005 10:49PM

Somebody needs to come up with a word that rhymes with orange!


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: paul turpin (---.w80-8.abo.wanadoo.fr)
Date: March 31, 2005 07:21AM

The inestimable J.C., diarist for 'The Times Literary Supplement' recently pointed out that 'New Scientist' had published an article claiming that there are no rhymes in English for the words orange, purple, silver and month. With the natural doubt of an enquiring mind he challenged his readers to come up with "a rhyming octave involving all four "non-rhyming" words". Consequently in the March 18th issue last, Tom Donnelly won the prize with this very nice tetrameter "Inge":

"I'm Ing", the Dean said. "I abhor Inj."
And gloomily fed the orang an orange.
With a twinge he recalled how every month,
Disciplined for lisping (Dunce, not dunth!),
From the prefects' room young Cringe would hirple
With prospects drear and buttocks purple.
Maybe thus the products of my quill were
Doomed to be lead, he mused, not silver.

I hope he won't mind me copying it here; it's such an odd and clever piece redolent with the particular eccentricities of the English!


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: paul turpin (---.w80-8.abo.wanadoo.fr)
Date: March 31, 2005 07:22AM

The inestimable J.C., diarist for 'The Times Literary Supplement' recently pointed out that 'New Scientist' had published an article claiming that there are no rhymes in English for the words orange, purple, silver and month. With the natural doubt of an enquiring mind he challenged his readers to come up with "a rhyming octave involving all four "non-rhyming" words". Consequently in the March 18th issue last, Tom Donnelly won the prize with this very nice tetrameter "Inge":

"I'm Ing", the Dean said. "I abhor Inj."
And gloomily fed the orang an orange.
With a twinge he recalled how every month,
Disciplined for lisping (Dunce, not dunth!),
From the prefects' room young Cringe would hirple
With prospects drear and buttocks purple.
Maybe thus the products of my quill were
Doomed to be lead, he mused, not silver.

I hope he won't mind me copying it here; it's such an odd and clever piece redolent with the particular eccentricities of the English!


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Desi (---.adsl.proxad.net)
Date: March 31, 2005 07:45AM


Linda said:
"The fruit is derived from the Arabic neranja, the colour from the fruit. But William of Orange?"

I would say the colour. In Dutch, the colour is Oranje (and william is called Willem van Oranje). The fruit Sinaasappel.

The name of William of Orange derives from the Prinsdom (principality) Orange in the South of France (most likely named after the fruit, I should think). The Nassau part of their name (the name of our royalty is van Oranje Nassau) is derived from a region in Germany.

On top of that our national anthom claims that william of orange is loyal to the Spanish king [www.dordt.nl] />
Can now understand why nationalism never really got a hold on the Netherlands... ;-)


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: paul turpin (---.w80-8.abo.wanadoo.fr)
Date: March 31, 2005 08:42AM

A propos, William Ralph Inge was the Dean of St. Paul's, 1911-1934. Apparently his sobriquet was 'the gloomy dean' and he has several aptly pessimistic quotations in google, amongst which: "Originality, I fear, is too often only undetected and frequently unconscious plagiarism." That would be one way of putting it. A sunnier person might have preferred to stress the interconnectedness of all things and the intellectual debts we all owe to each other. Still, if he has left no other lasting memorial then at least we have his name in the clever verse above


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Pam Adams (---.bus.csupomona.edu)
Date: April 01, 2005 02:48PM

There's a science fiction writer named Dean Ing, just to confuse things!

pam


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: TJ Oz (202.59.21.---)
Date: April 07, 2005 04:31AM

Hey folks
What's wrong with challenge, expunge, lozenge and scavenge ??


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-02rh15-16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: April 07, 2005 11:38AM

Uh, they don't rhyme? Well, perhaps for Emily Dickinson they do, but she was a case unto herself.

<[www.poeticbyway.com] />
[tinyurl.com] />
However,

There was a young maiden from Torrance
Who was ravished while sucking an orange
Which turned her deep purple
Since, denying the slurple
Quite filled her with hate and abhorrence.

That rhymes quite nicely, of course.

Well, maybe not ...


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: TJ Oz (202.59.21.---)
Date: April 07, 2005 10:38PM

Methinks a word rhyming with orange
Could be something as simple as lozenge
Now Hugh can't agree
But thatís fine with me
Do you think that heís up to the challenge?


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Desi (---.adsl.proxad.net)
Date: April 08, 2005 05:53AM

Sorry Hugh, according to my longman pronunciation dictionary orange, challenge and lozenge rhyme. However, the last syllable is unstressed, which of course makes you focus on the forelast syllable, which makes the rhyme awkward say the least.


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Hugh Clary (---.denver-02rh15-16rt.co.dial-access.att.net)
Date: April 08, 2005 11:25AM

I have not read the Longman, but it is definitely incorrect. Words must rhyme on the 'stressed' syllable. I understand pairs like 'vivid' and 'hid' are called 'light rhymes', but I believe the requirement for 'orange' is that it must have a 'perfect' rhyme.

Other strange kinds of rhymes are 'amphisbaenic', such as tail/collate, where the final syllable of one word is the reverse of its mate, and 'elided', where one word would be the perfect rhyme of another, if only the last vowel sound were removed, such as fervid/curved (elision).

For some other interesting treatments, see:

[www.angelfire.com]


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: Desi (---.adsl.proxad.net)
Date: April 08, 2005 05:01PM

thanks for the enlightment. The longman just gives the pronunciation, so it was my bad, not its. Never heard of the amphisbaenic. Interesting.


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: David Reading (---.wight365.net)
Date: May 22, 2005 12:21PM

Corrin,Jade and Jerry
Love Orangeade and Sherry


Re: Rhymes with Orange!
Posted by: David Reading (---.wight365.net)
Date: May 22, 2005 12:43PM

To summarise what I think I know and have read about orange rhymes.

Gorringe is definitely an extant surname. I have met at least one person of that surname and have seen a shop front bearing the name, as well as the rhyme about H.H.Gorringe.

Eminem has used door-hinge, I believe, and I have seen it elsewhere in an internet search. This is the most satisfactory of the imperfect rhymes in my opinion. Lozenge,syringe, challenge,singe and other partial rhymes have their attractions but miss the mark, I think.

I have seen the suggestion of sporange, though I think its correct form is sporangium.

There are then forms which use two words eg foreign jokes, orange oaks
or similar ideas such as that I posted a few minutes ago:

Corrin, Jade and Jerry
Love Orangeade and Sherry.

I speak with a London accent and these last two examples work for me.

I have not seen reference to the porringer dish.Porringer clearly rhymes with oranger. Haliborange is a marketed brand.

That's it for the moment.




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