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simple language
Posted by: drpeternsz (192.168.128.---)
Date: October 19, 2005 06:12PM

The Baroque shores of a rich poem
Present with their Madrigal words
A world obscured and ground to sand
By the diminishing tide of
“Write in plain and simple language.”


Re: simple language
Posted by: rikki (192.168.128.---)
Date: October 19, 2005 08:38PM

The poet was exuberant,
along his labyrinth shouting.
'Good fellow, you must trim,'
the critics came a-clouting.

And so he cut and pruned,
at their behesting ...
and now remain no bowers,
nor sweet birds nesting.


Mary Fullerton (1868-1946)


Re: simple language
Posted by: lg (Moderator)
Date: October 19, 2005 09:08PM

The language beneath the language:
This is poetry.

- Andrea Pacione


Re: simple language
Posted by: IanB (192.168.128.---)
Date: October 20, 2005 10:00PM

I prefer to think of poetry as above ordinary language. A supernal language.

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/20/2005 10:01PM by IanB.


Re: simple language
Posted by: lg (Moderator)
Date: October 20, 2005 11:02PM

Poetry is an orphan of silence. The words never
quite equal the experience behind them.

- Charles Simic


Re: simple language
Posted by: drpeternsz (192.168.128.---)
Date: October 21, 2005 02:45AM

Meant only for Supermen and other aliens to common culture, evidently. Lol.


Re: simple language
Posted by: IanB (192.168.128.---)
Date: October 21, 2005 06:46PM

No, Peter. The supernal is there, whether we tune in or not. You don't have to be a superman or an alien to let it resonate through you. You just need to have or develop sensitivity. It's like that old saying: 'A cat may look at a Queen'. Except that a cat evidently doesn't care to share its experience. That's the other thing a poet needs, the urge to report the supernal, to propagate it in common culture. Perhaps the saying should be 'A dog may bark at a Queen'.

PS: In writing the above, I feel I'm already in danger of getting stuck in a limited metaphor, so don't intend to pursue it to the death. Don't want to become like a dolphin enmeshed in a shark net. Lol.

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/21/2005 07:07PM by IanB.


Re: simple language
Posted by: drpeternsz (192.168.128.---)
Date: October 21, 2005 07:11PM

Seems I'm ok then, since I take all of creation to be sacred and divine.


Re: simple language
Posted by: IanB (192.168.128.---)
Date: October 21, 2005 10:09PM

Les, that's a strange metaphor from Charles Simic, 'an orphan of silence'. Doesn't seem to fit his next sentence. Can you interpret?

As for that next sentence, I think Simic is right some of the time, and wrong some of the time.

Many experiences are too complex to be conveyed fully in words, though we try by using metaphors, vivid images, words with overtones, etc.

At the same time, there are descriptions in poetry (and in prose) which we accept as meaningful, even though reality couldn't possibly correspond. An example would be those words, now a humorous cliche, devised by the pioneer writers of 'ripping yarns' to get their hero out of terminal trouble: 'With one bound, Jack was free.' How in reality could anyone get unbound by bounding?!

Ian


Re: simple language
Posted by: Veronika (192.168.128.---)
Date: October 21, 2005 10:30PM

"Poetry is an orphan of silence. The words never
quite equal the experience behind them."

- Charles Simic

I love this quote. Thanks for posting it.


Re: simple language
Posted by: lg (Moderator)
Date: October 22, 2005 12:24AM



You will find poetry nowhere unless you bring some with you.
- Joubert


Les




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